Scrolling with Socks

January 8, 2019

When I finished the helix striped hat, I realized that I didn’t have another project ready to cast on. This shouldn’t have been a surprise since I’m the one who decides. I knew I hadn’t selected what to make next, but somehow, I was a tad surprised. Go figure.

So I did what I usually do when I’m between projects: I tossed some sock yarn and DPNs into my bag and cast on a sock when I got to Mom’s for the afternoon. As I worked the first few rounds, I had a bit of an epiphany — casting on a sock is a bit like scrolling Instagram or Twitter. When I find myself in a temporary lull in knitting activity, I turn to socks.

Here’s the latest: self-striping Patons Kroy sock yarn in Blue Striped Ragg.

To add a bit of variety, I decided to make a contrasting heel and toe, something new for me. Since I couldn’t find any suitable matching yarn in my stash, I used a ball of maroon fingering of indeterminate origin.

When I’d finished the flap and turned the heel, I decided that it just wouldn’t do. The yarn was too thin, which would make for a less durable heel. See the gaps among the stitches?

I ripped out the flap and decided to try knitting with two strands of the maroon fingering. It was a bit bulky, but I’d rather have a too sturdy heel than one that wears through too soon.

It’s almost time to start shaping the toe. While I don’t know the exact measurement of the recipient’s foot, I have an approximation — about an inch or so longer than mine. I think.

I really like the look and feel of this yarn and just may use it to make a sweater for a baby-to-be who’s due to arrive this spring. If you’ve got a pattern idea, please let me know in the comments.

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First Helix Stripes

January 3, 2019

The latest in my ongoing quest to learn new knitting techniques (and, at least once so far, crochet techniques) has been helical stripes — sometimes called “helix stripes.” They’re single stripes in the round — and at first glance, look like regular stripes — but they don’t have the usual “jog” that appears when switching colors. 

helix-stripe-hat

The lovely Shibui Staccato leftover from the color block mitts seemed like the perfect combination. 

Helix stripes aren’t really stripes; they’re spirals. Each color is knit partway around the circle, then the next color is used (without twisting the strands), then the third. And so on. 

The spirals are easiest to see at the crown. Pick a color and follow it down from the crown. See?

helix-stripe-hat-top

I found this video by Pepperly helpful in explaining how to knit helix stripes. She was a bit more concerned about avoiding tangling the three yarns than I was. My solution was to occasionally do a big untangle rather than taking care not to get tangled in the first place!

I quite like the finished project and most definitely like that I’ve learned a new technique.

However, as with the fingerless mitts made with the same yarn, I don’t know who I’ll give the hat to! Anyone looking for a matched set?

What knitting technique or pattern have you learned recently? Or what’s on your list?

 

 

 

 


When in Doubt

December 19, 2018

A few weeks ago, my friend Barbara asked for help adding an i-cord edge to the bulky seed stitch blanket she’d knit for her grandson, a first-year college student. (Purl Soho’s Eleventh Hour Marled Blanket) Naturally, I was happy to help. If only it’d been so simple.

After following my directions, she wasn’t pleased with the final result — the blanket wouldn’t lie flat and was somewhat pulled in along the edge — and asked again for some assistance. When I got the blanket home, I realized that I’d given her the wrong instructions for making the i-cord border.

I thought of my Mom’s frequent saying, “When in doubt, read the instructions.” If only I’d thought of it before I’d “helped” her!

I removed the wonky i-cord border, evened out some of the yarn joins, washed the edge-less blanket, and blocked it on Hannah’s bed.

knit blanket blocking on bed

While it dried, I reviewed a few video tutorials on how to do a proper i-cord edge. It’s remarkable what a difference a bit of knowledge makes!

attach i-cord edge to blanket

Not surprisingly, the new edge looked much better than the previous version. It was, after all, a true i-cord edge.

close up of i-cord edge

It’s more a throw than a full-sized blanket, but I’m quite confident it’s plenty big enough to wrap one very lucky young man in the love of his grandmother.

eleventh hour marled blanket

As for my own projects, I’ve turned the heel and completed the gusset on the second sock. While I’m feeling confident that I’ll time to finish by Christmas morning, I’m beginning to wonder if I actually have enough yarn….

knitting sock heel gusset


Socks Received

December 8, 2018

Kevin’s first final exam of his senior year is later today — fluid dynamics (or is it dynamic fluids?!) So I was relieved to learn that the good-luck socks I mailed earlier this week had arrived — and more importantly, that he was glad to have received them.

smiling selfie with socks held to cheek

text message: They're so soft!!! Thank you momma - heart emoji

I know, as my wise sister-in-law would say, “smart is not something you are but something you become” and that handknit socks don’t have a direct effect one one’s mastery of mechanical engineering, but if this pair of cozy socks provides a bit of comfort and confidence to this remarkable young man, that’d be wonderful.

In the meantime, I’ve been working on his next pair, to be opened on Christmas morning, when final exams are finished and the next semester’s work has yet to begin.

sock-toe-shape

May the Force be with you, dear boy. And may your efforts be rewarded.

 

 


Warm Hands and Cookie Traditions

December 7, 2018

The colorblock hand warmers (Purl Soho pattern, Shibui Staccato yarn) are off the needles, blocked, and ready for…whom? I don’t know.

I made them because I fell in love with the yarn while treating myself to a gift certificate purchase  (thanks, Jill!) at the amazing Gather Here in Somerville.

color-block-hand-warmers

I’m not thrilled with the thumb hole. To be precise, I’m not thrilled that there’s just a hole and not an actual thumb covering. It gets mighty cold here in the Boston area, and having your thumbs exposed just isn’t that practical. But they look lovely, so perhaps, as my grandmother used to say, “your pride will keep you warm.”

Yesterday was the Feast of St. Nicholas, and as is tradition in my family, the day was marked with cookies. In each of my siblings homes, from Alexandria, VA to Boston, these thin, crisp, spiced treats were rolled, sliced, baked, and enjoyed.

st-nick-cookies

I’ve mailed some to Kevin and Michael, sustenance for their upcoming final exams. And I’ve tucked a few away for Hannah, who will be home for a couple of days next week. If you’d like the recipe, you’ll find it on my December 6 post from a few years ago.

What are some of your winter holiday traditions (baked and otherwise)?

 

 

 

 


WIP Wednesday: Socks in a Flash

December 5, 2018

On Monday, after learning that Kevin’s first final exam will be this Saturday, I raided my stash of Christmas socks and mailed a pair to him. As he knows, the academic benefits of handknit socks haven’t been scientifically proven, but it certainly can’t hurt to have your feet wrapped in love and know that you’ve got a big fan in your corner. Right?

Of course, that meant that I needed to knit another pair of socks for Christmas. 

A morning trip to the hair salon provided time for knitting. You can see the crimps and crinkles in the yarn, leftover from its previous incarnation (a failed toe-up sock experiment). I expect blocking will ease that out entirely.

I knit several more inches at Mom’s in the afternoon as we listened to Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong on CD (her favorites). She’s making great progress on her latest garter stitch scarf.

The yarn is really yummy: Junkyarn‘s “Tini” colorway. The bright flecks of color never fail to delight Mom, who holds them up and exclaims, “look at this!” 

If I’d been tasked with naming this colorway, I would have selected “Peppermint Stick,” since it reminds me of the peppermint stick ice cream at my favorite island soda counter.

 


What Babies Do

December 1, 2018

Now that December is upon us and gift-giving holidays are fast approaching (Chanukah begins tomorrow evening), many knitters have projects on the needles and are facing deadlines. I’ve heard that some are freaking out beginning to fret about whether they’ll finish in time — knitting a big of anxiety into each stitch ;-)

Giving a handmade gift feels wonderful. I must confess that I often wonder how often the recipient actually uses or wears the gift. That’s no different than any gift you might give. Did they ever read that book or wear those earrings or use that kitchen gadget?

So I’m always particularly pleased to know that one of my handknits is being enjoyed. For example, getting a text extolling the power of handknit socks. I was delighted to learn last week that a scrumptious baby was wearing his cardigan and hat for the last time (Baby Vertebrae sweater in Neighborhood Fibre Co’s “Old Towne East” colorway).

baby wearing knit cardigan and hat

One of the many delightful attributes of small humans is that they grow, so there’s an ongoing need for new knits.

What’s on your knitting gift list?

 

 


Smoother Sock Toes

November 27, 2018

It’s no secret that I love to knit socks. Although it took me ages to take the plunge, I’ve almost always had one on the needles as a second (or third) project, especially when I need something portable. 

My latest pair is made with a vibrant skein of Lady Dye’s Superwash Fingering (can’t recall the colorway).  

knit socks in sink before blocking

The Yarn Harlot’s Good Plain Sock Recipe continues to be my go-to pattern, but I’ve discovered a new technique that makes the toe graft smoother.

Top-down socks need to have the toes “closed” by grafting, rather than by seaming, which would create an uncomfortable lumpy edge in one’s shoe. I’ve always used the Kitchener stitch but had never been able to achieve an invisible graft — there was always a bit of a line. See? 

The recipients of my socks didn’t seem to mind at all. In fact, some say they are “real juju” especially when facing academic challenges. But I was still on out the look out for a better technique.

And I found one, thanks to the TECHknitter. Instead of using a darning needle to graft the two sides together, you use a double-pointed needle. It shouldn’t make a difference since the grafting yarn is traveling in the same way. But it made a remarkable difference for me — a smooth, truly seamless toe. 

I always feel so clever when I learn something new!

Socks are blocked, dry, and tucked away for someone (still haven’t figured out who though).

two finished knit socks

 

 

 

 


Triple C

November 26, 2018

The crocheted cowl is complete. (See what I did there?)

Learning to crochet has been on my to-do list for a while, and I’m happy to say that I’ve finished a project. May I present the Shady Cowl (a.k.a. the Eggnog Cowl)…

shady-cowl-finishThat photo makes it look more fuchsia-y than it is. The color in the photo below is more accurate. Yarn is from Neighbhorhood Fibre Co., colorway is Dupont Circle.

shady-cowl-fold

It’s too early for me to know whether I’ll do much more crochet. Not surprisingly, since I’ve been doing it for decades, knitting is more familiar and seems to hold almost-infinite variations. Of course, if I don’t practice crochet, it won’t become familiar. 

For now, I’ll just remain pleased with my first project. 


Mitts and Socks

November 12, 2018
Late last month, Patrick and I joined a couple of cousins at a beautiful and stirring choral concert. The concert — which had been planned for months and by tragic coincidence occurred one week after the massacre at the Tree of Life Synagogue — featured music from Terezín Concentration Camp and a new composition, Anne Frank: A Living Voice.
Top-down sock in Lady Dye Yarns (unknown color way)
A few days later, as I’ve done for the past couple of years, I worked at a local polling place on Election Day. Unlike at September’s primary election, turn-out was robust (heavy?). By the time voting began at 7a.m., there was a line of 45 people waiting to cast their ballots. I’d started my first fingerless mitt (Purl Soho Colorblock Hand Warmers) and managed only a couple of inches during my entire eight-hour shift.
view from voting check-in table at 6:40am, 20 mins before polls opened
The yarn is Shibui Staccato, a luscious blend of merino and silk. I’ll modify the pattern because I’ve got three rather than four colors. The total length is 12 inches, and rather than knit four inches in each color, I think I’ll mix it up a bit. What do you think?

That Stitch Looks Funny

November 11, 2018
Being able to read your stitches is a skill that novice knitters learn sooner than they realize. “Something doesn’t look right, but I don’t know what’s wrong” is a common sentiment. The first step to fixing a mistake is realizing you made a mistake.  That’s what happened recently to friend Pat, who’s making a baby blanket and is convinced she can only knit while sitting at my kitchen table. Back at home, she discovered that her stitches had become super tight, making it difficult to even insert the needle. Here’s what she’d encountered.
knitting into the back of a stitch twisted on the needle
Unknowingly, she’d been knitting into the back of her stitches. This results in a twist of each stitch, making each one a bit too tight. Her knit stitches were sitting backwards on her left needle, making it awkward (kind of twisted) to insert the right needle. Once I pointed out the difference between a backward “sitting” stitch and one that sits properly on the needle, she was able to really see the difference. And now you can, too. Think of someone sitting on a horse; one leg on each side. In knitting, the “legs” are the sides of the stitch and the “horse” is the needle. When a stitch is on backwards, it’s as though the rider’s legs are on the wrong sides of the horse – making the rider backwards.
To fix a backward stitch, you simply pinch the stitch between your fingers, take it off the needle, turn it around, and put the turned-around stitch back on the needle.
In other knitting news, Mom finished her latest garter stitch scarf. This one in the rich green with blue tones of the Pines colorway of Malabrigo Rios.  She decided to blow a kiss when I asked her to model it for me.
I’m making progress on the Second Sock and have started the color block fingerless mitts in Shibui that I mentioned last week. More soon!      

Soft and Squishy

November 2, 2018
While my first crochet project, Shady Cowl, was blocking, it was time to cast on something new.
Sure, I’ve got one sock completed and the second not yet cast on, but socks don’t really count as projects in my book. (Do I even have a book?!) Thanks to a generous, thoughtful gift from one of my SILs, I had the impetus to visit Gather Here, an amazingly inspiring knitting and sewing shop with a social justice conscience that I’ve been following on Instagram for a few years. I can’t begin to describe the range of yarns, fabrics, helpful employees, and friendly patrons that I found. Plus, I was too busy fondling yarn and trying to decide what to buy to take a single photo. If you’re in the Boston area and looking for a yarn shop, head to Gather Here. I returned home with four lusciously soft skeins for two projects. This trio of Shibui merino and silk will become a pair (or maybe two) of color block fingerless mitts.
Almost as soon as I got home, my new squishy skein of Manos Del Uruguay Silk Blend was on the winder. Like the Shibui, it’s a 70/30 merino/silk blend.  Before too long, it’ll be tucked away into my gift box — a Messy Bun Hat for someone special.
double lace rib knit pattern of messy bun hat
The photo doesn’t do justice to the soft champagne pink color of this yummy yarn. Because a couple of you asked, here’s a photo of Mom’s latest garter stitch scarf — in a rich green Malabrigo Rios — that I mentioned in my last post.
Every single day, I’m grateful that she still remembers how to knit.

Blocking to the Rescue

October 23, 2018

Pretty much from the time I cast on the Starshower shawl-cowl, I began thinking about blocking it when I finished. It was knitting up kind of stiff, even though the pattern was lace-ish, and didn’t have the drape that I was hoping for.

Did I swatch before I started? Why, no I didn’t. Thanks for asking. And while I really like the purple-grey yarn with a hint of sparkle, I couldn’t find the yarn band, so I was completely clueless about the weight.

Did I let these details hinder my project? Of course not! At last week’s neighborhood book group gathering, I worked the last pattern repeat.

starshower-book-group

Wine, cheese, crackers, and cake — and not a copy of the book, Before We Were Yours, in sight! At a doctor’s appointment on Friday, I binded off (or is it “bound off”?) and plopped it into the sink when I got home.

Starshower-bindoff.JPG

 

When I stretched it out on Hannah’s bed for blocking, I was pleased that it felt looser, softer, and a bit larger. Sure enough, after it dried, it had a lovely drape and a softer feel. It’s designed to be worn either as a cowl or a snug shawl around the shoulders. I’m not sure which I prefer, but I’m glad to have the option.

starshower-cowl2

starshower-shoulders

 

 

 

 


Beginner Brioche (Not Bread)

October 15, 2018
Continuing my quest to learn new things (and no, I’ve not finished the crochet cowl), I went to this month’s knitting guild meeting to learn to do the brioche stitch. Coming from a family of foodies and talented bakers, I’d only known about the edible brioche. The knitted version is a deceptively simple-looking, extra squishy stitch that is often knit in two colors. The guild instructor brought a sample of this Beginner Brioche Cowl.
Looks a bit like stockinette stitch — rows of knit stitches in columns of alternating colors. As I said, deceptively simple. Something I learned: counting is different in brioche. Each row is worked twice, and a single stitch plus an accompanying yarn over (which, for some reason, is referred to as its “shawl”) is counted as one stitch. Go figure! We started with one color brioche. I made the mistake of using the dark grey yarn I’d brought. Pro tip: stitches are easier to see in a lighter color. Nonetheless, I was able to work a few rows of real brioche. brioche-guild After everyone had worked a few rows in a single color, we ripped them out and dived in to two-color brioche. The instructions provided were all words — no diagrams or photos – which added to the challenge. I found myself chanting quietly as I worked across each row. The meditative aspect of knitting in action. twocolor-brioche I was pretty pleased with the way the grey knit stitches stood out from the orange purl bumps. But when I turned it over, I could see that I’d done something wrong. See how the grey cuts across the lovely orange column? back-brioche Being a novice briocher (is that a thing?), I couldn’t figure out what exactly I’d done wrong, but I knew that the error extended across a row. Looks like a purl that should’ve been a knit. Maybe. Although I ripped out the second swatch at the end of the meeting, I haven’t given up the possibility of a future brioche project. Maybe the Beginners Brioche Cowl in a couple of beautiful colors of bulky weight yarn. I’m open to all suggestions and recommendations. In the meantime, I’m making good progress with Starshower. I really enjoy the pattern and love the yarn — just hoping that it softens and drapes more once it’s blocked. starshower-cowl

Socked in at the Summit

October 10, 2018
It wasn’t until college that I learned about “leaf peepers.” Having grown up in Maine but never having thought very much about the changing colors of autumn — except that I loved the season — I didn’t realize that people travel hundreds of miles — often by bus tour — to view the brilliant foliage. (Yes, I was naive!) Last weekend, Patrick and I joined our friend Paul and son Ethan for a day hike in New Hampshire. The 2.5 hour drive provided opportunity for lots of knitting on my latest project, the Starshower shawl-cowl hybrid.
(Wish I could remember what yarn I’m using, but it was unlabeled in my stash. I’ll poke around and see if I can find the rogue yarn band in the bin.) Fortunately, we had no expectations of solitude or a quiet ascent. The small parking area at the trail head was full when we arrived at 10am, so we joined a dozen or so “overflow” vehicles along the dirt road and began our ascent. We passed and were passed by a range of hikers and dogs — small and large — on the steady climb over rocky trail and switchbacks. Recent rain and mountain springs made the going quite muddy and occasionally slippery, especially on moss-covered rocks. On a clear day, Osceola’s summit offers expansive views of surrounding valleys and peaks in the White Mountains, but when we arrived 1 3/4 hours after starting, it was shrouded in misty clouds.
As we ate our lunch and stretched out on the rocks — joined by 20 or so other hikers, about half of whom were Quebecois visiting for the long Thanksgiving weekend — the sun threatened to burn through the clouds. Standing at the edge, we watched the air currents flow up from the valley and glimpsed birds flying through the mist. Suddenly the clouds opened, giving us a view to the bright carpet of leaves across the valley and nearby peaks, including a ski area.
After five minutes or so, the curtain closed, and we were again surrounded by swirling clouds. We took that as the cue to begin our descent, returning via the same trail. Our route from the National Forest provided a brilliant reminder of the season’s beauty. Count me among the leaf peepers for life.

Calling on St. Clare

September 27, 2018
I’m teaching my dear friend Pat how to knit. To be more precise, I’m helping her refresh and expand her knitting skills since she knit a couple projects back in college. To her first lesson, she brought me a small wooden token of St. Clare, who I was surprised to learn is the patron saint of needle workers.
Don’t the colors blend nicely with the Vanilla Latte sock? Pat got the token from the Isabella Stewart Gardner Museum in Boston; it’s taken from one of the many tapestries that hang in the exquisite and eccentric museum, which is also the site of the largest unsolved art heist. If you’re a podcast fan, check out “Last Seen,” a fascinating story about the theft and nearly 30 year search for the missing treasures. According to the inscription on the back, St. Clare, who was also a buddy of St. Francis of Assisi, is also the patron saint of sore eyes.
This dual patronage makes a lot of sense given the strain involved in deciphering stitches, not just for those working without the benefit of electric lights but for those of us who struggle to figure out what to make of the yarn on our needles — or in my case, as I continue my quest to learn crochet, our hooks. Here was my second attempt at the first couple of rounds of the Sandy Cowl (which, for some inexplicable reason, is also called the Eggnog Cowl).
My eyes definitely strained to decipher why each stitch was so tight and looked nothing like the pattern photos. I know hope I’ll be able to “read” the stitches as I get more practice, but I’m definitely not there yet. I ripped out the second attempt and went back to YouTube for some basic instructions and practice with the most basic of beginner stitches, the single crochet. With the token of St. Clare propped on a nearby table, I cast on and began again. I still can’t read the stitches very well, but I can definitely see — without eye strain — that I’m getting the hang of it.
Thanks, Clare.

Something New Every Day

September 20, 2018
Part of what I love about knitting is the opportunity to learn something new — whether it be a new stitch, discovering the magic of blocking,  or figuring out how to make a too-small sweater bigger.  For at least a year, I’ve been saying (mostly to myself) that I want to learn how to crochet. Yesterday, I bit the bullet.
And boy, did it feel fiddly! The chain stitch cast on was a piece of cake, but it took me ages (well, a bunch of minutes) to figure out how to hold the working yarn, stitches, and hook. The experience gave me new appreciation for the challenges of my beginner knitting students. I discovered, pleasantly but not surprisingly, that the process began to feel easier with practice. It’s what I tell novice knitters and turns out, it’s right! I started with a basic square of single crochet using a bit of leftover cotton yarn from my stash.
I can’t yet “read” the stitches very well. Sure, I can see a couple of spots that don’t look right, but I have no idea what went wrong nor how to fix them. That’s going to take some more practice. I felt so delighted with this little accomplishment that I decided I should dive into a pattern. Ha! Lessons learned: don’t try to learn a new skill after 9pm nor after a glass of wine. My next step will be to learn a few more basic stitches like double crochet or half-double crochet (what?!) before attempting an actual project. Any suggestions for a beginner crochet project that doesn’t involve granny squares? Back in the knitting world, I’ve just finished the first Vanilla Latte sock. Yarn is Urth Merino Sock, colorway 2018. The person who’ll receive these for Christmas has bigger feet than I do, so even though I used my foot as a rough gauge, I continued a bit longer before shaping the toe.

New Normal for Now

September 14, 2018

I’m happy to report that Mom’s been home for a few weeks and has regained her pre-pneumonia strength and balance. It helped that she was quite fit before she was hospitalized and that we walked with her around the hospital floor several times a day whether she wanted to or not.

Last week, we introduced a couple of home health aides who help five days each week so brother Luke and I can maintain our work lives, sanity, and marriages. We also consider it an insurance policy of sorts so that neither of us is overwhelmed if the other gets sick, has a major work obligation, or wants to take a day trip or — gasp — vacation.

The transition and adjustment has been blessedly smooth. The aides are professional, kind, and experienced. Although she’s sometimes confused about why they’re there, Mom has welcomed them into her home and life quite readily.

A few days ago, she agreed to return to the hair salon, a short walk down the hill, after refusing to go for several weeks. The wonderful staff were pleased to see her and told her so. While her hair was washed, cut, and styled, I resumed my usual seat by the window and worked a few rounds of the Vanilla Latte sock.

Sock-salon

Yarn is Urth Merino Sock, colorway 2018, a mix of bright blues, greens, and oranges.

We spend a fair bit of time each day knitting. I don’t like to even think of the day that she forgets how to do the knit stitch. Having finished two garter stitch scarves, Mom has started another one in a lovely creamy white. I cast on 30 stitches, and she’s taken it from there.

mom-knits

Yesterday, we were joined — remotely — by my friend Judy, who reported that she was back in the knitting routine, too. From her home about 60 miles away, she sent an update via text.

striped-sock-judy

I believe the yarn is Diversity from Plymouth Yarn (Zebra colorway). Pretty sure I was with her when she bought it.

She makes knee socks while I prefer mid-calf or just below. If you’re a sock knitter, what’s your preference?

 

 

 


Mitts and New Knits

September 11, 2018

When I bought a few skeins of Koigu KPPPM at Flock in late July, I felt justified in straying from my “no new yarn” resolution guiding principle. After all, I’d just finished two projects and certainly deserved a reward, right?

Plus it was on sale, so I practically was required to add these lovely skeins to my stash.

Koigu-yarn-skeins

One of the things I’ve learned about my yarn buying and stashing is that I’m much more apt to use yarn within a reasonable amount of time (let’s not get into what my definition of “reasonable” is though) if I have a project in mind. I realized this a couple of years ago after I pruned my stash and gave away nearly everything for which I didn’t have a specific project — or at least a well-defined concept.

Sock yarn never falls into the giveaway pile because I always know what I’ll make with it.

But when Mom was in the hospital and I needed something portable and easy, even socks seemed a bit too ambitious. So I made a couple of baby hats with one skein.

barley-hat-baby

Once she got home and we established a new routine, I decided that I could cast on something a bit more complex. But socks didn’t seem to the right fit – pardon the pun. So I decided on fingerless mitts.

Knit-vote

Must admit that, at the cuff, these look quite similar to (some might say indistinguishable from) top-down socks.

While it’s still summer for a couple more weeks and I’m not eager to think of weather cold enough for mitts, it feels great to have a knit gift tucked away for December. I’m not sure why they look so orange-y in this photo.

mitt-envy

On Friday, I mailed a pair of socks from my gift box to Michael, who entered his third decade yesterday. We must be having fun because time sure is flying.

So naturally, I have to cast on a new pair of socks to replenish the supply. I’m pretty sure Christmas is just around the corner.

urth-sock-yarn

 

 

 

 


Vote One, Knit Two

September 5, 2018

A couple of years ago, I became a local election volunteer — not for a particular candidate (although I still do that) but for our city. You know, one of those people who welcomes you to the polling place, checks your name off a list, hands you a ballot, directs you to the electronic vote-counting machine, and hands out “I Voted” stickers.

I consider it a small action to support our democracy and, thanks to the detailed training involved and adherence to law and procedures, to upholding people’s confidence in the voting process.

election-training

Turnout for yesterday’s state primary election was pretty light (that is, lighter than our country’s generally low turnout), so I had time to do a bit of knitting.

You didn’t think I’d go to an eight-hour shift during which I’d be sitting and chatting with my fellow volunteer (a lovely Vietnam War vet who spent 20 years working in the State Department before taking over his father’s business) without my knitting, did you?!

Knit-vote

I started the second fingerless mitt (Mitt Envy in Koigu KPPPM), the cuff of which looks like the start of a top-down sock. I’d finished the first one the day before while hanging out with Mom, who graciously agreed to be a hand model.

Fingerless-mitt-agh

While there weren’t any major municipal races, there were a couple of big upsets elsewhere in the state. And I sure hope the ripples turn into a wave come November.

 

 

 

 


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