Posts Tagged ‘baby hat’

Mitts and New Knits

September 11, 2018

When I bought a few skeins of Koigu KPPPM at Flock in late July, I felt justified in straying from my “no new yarn” resolution guiding principle. After all, I’d just finished two projects and certainly deserved a reward, right?

Plus it was on sale, so I practically was required to add these lovely skeins to my stash.

Koigu-yarn-skeins

One of the things I’ve learned about my yarn buying and stashing is that I’m much more apt to use yarn within a reasonable amount of time (let’s not get into what my definition of “reasonable” is though) if I have a project in mind. I realized this a couple of years ago after I pruned my stash and gave away nearly everything for which I didn’t have a specific project — or at least a well-defined concept.

Sock yarn never falls into the giveaway pile because I always know what I’ll make with it.

But when Mom was in the hospital and I needed something portable and easy, even socks seemed a bit too ambitious. So I made a couple of baby hats with one skein.

barley-hat-baby

Once she got home and we established a new routine, I decided that I could cast on something a bit more complex. But socks didn’t seem to the right fit – pardon the pun. So I decided on fingerless mitts.

Knit-vote

Must admit that, at the cuff, these look quite similar to (some might say indistinguishable from) top-down socks.

While it’s still summer for a couple more weeks and I’m not eager to think of weather cold enough for mitts, it feels great to have a knit gift tucked away for December. I’m not sure why they look so orange-y in this photo.

mitt-envy

On Friday, I mailed a pair of socks from my gift box to Michael, who entered his third decade yesterday. We must be having fun because time sure is flying.

So naturally, I have to cast on a new pair of socks to replenish the supply. I’m pretty sure Christmas is just around the corner.

urth-sock-yarn

 

 

 

 

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Baby Blues

August 21, 2018

I thoroughly enjoyed making a Baby Vertebrae sweater for a friend’s Baby-to-Be. The name is a bit puzzling. My brother asked, “what’s up with that baby spine sweater?”

The pattern gets its name (I presume) because the sweater covers the baby’s back and not its front – an open front makes better snuggling and less cleaning of inevitable spit-ups and dribbles. Plus, no buttons, button holes, or button bands.

I love the Neighborhood Fibre Co. yarn  (worsted in Old Towne East) so much that I decided to add a little hat.

Baby-knits

Many thanks for all the kind wishes for dear Mom. I’m happy to report she’s home and getting a bit stronger each day. I’m still confident that knitting helps her, and I know it helps me.

Knitting in the Whirlwind of Life

August 18, 2018

The past week has been a bit of a whirlwind in this little corner of the world. And as I’ve wondered many a time — including on the blog — how do non-knitters weather the storms of life?

For example, when your brother drives your Mom to the doctor’s office after she’s woken with a fever, uncontrollable shivering, and even more confused than usual — what do you do if you can’t concentrate on your knitting in the back seat?

On two consecutive nights last week, Mom spent seven hours in the hospital emergency room.  On the second evening, while she dozed and we waited for a room to become available, the Barley Light baby hat kept my hands and mind occupied and mostly calm.

Barley-hat-MGH

Diagnosis: pneumonia (albeit with no cough or shortness of breath). After a day or so of IV antibiotics and with continual supplemental oxygen, Mom was able to walk slowly.

AGH-MGH-walk

The network of nearby siblings, spouses, and (grand)children made it possible for us to tag-team each other, so she was rarely alone. The baby hat finished, I brought in a friend’s entrelac blanket for finishing touches — weaving in ends and closing up loose connections.

MGH-ends

I’m confident that our being present to translate the questions and actions of the medical staff and to provide encouragement and comfort (including watching our Red Sox continue their remarkable season), especially at times when the fear and incomprehensibility of Mom’s world overwhelmed her, helped her healing progress.

By Wednesday, when her oxygen monitor was removed from her finger, even she was able to knit.

AGH-MGHa

Although she won’t believe it until she’s in the car, she’s going home later today. The recuperation will continue in the comfort and familiarity of her apartment. I’ll be casting on a new project soon, doing my best to knit gratitude and love into each stitch.

 

 

 

Treasures from Knitting Class

December 19, 2015

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, I love teaching knitting. One of the best parts is watching a knitter, novice or one with experience, work through a project — deciphering a pattern, fixing the inevitable mistakes, and finally finishing.

First up, Debbie, a beginner whose patience, good humor, and perseverance are remarkable. She has an eye for her work, which means she can spot mistakes quickly. And, as I say in every class, every knitter — even the most experienced– makes mistakes. Debbie started with a small cotton washcloth, my go-to first project. She’s now working on a scarf (more on that in a future post).

 Next, there’s my down-the-street neighbor Marcia, who’s zipping through projects like a whirling dervish. (Do they knit?!) Her first socks were finished just in time for teen daughter’s birthday. As you can see, she loves them.

 As the mother of two teenagers, Marcia’s become a late-night knitter whose found the soothing benefits of knitting while waiting up for the safe return of said teens. She recently completed a lovely and deliciously soft chromatic cowl.

 In time for Christmas giving, Pam completed a dropped stitch scarf for her teen son. He’s not usually a scarf wearer, but after holding this soft beauty, he declared that he’d definitely wear this one.

 Gillan, a fiber artist, has finished an exquisite sweater and hat for a friend’s child. Regular readers will recall Gillan’s sweater seaming challenge, which she obviously remedied.   I’m particularly fond of her choice of buttons, picking up on the fiery colors of the yarn.   I hope this gives you an idea of why I love these knitting students, whom I proudly dub “Fearless Knitters.”

Topping Off a Baby Hat with a Tassel

March 2, 2015

Gillan, a fiber artist who’s one of the Fearless Knitters in my weekly knitting class, made an adorable baby hat. Don’t you agree?

Simple Colorful Knit Baby Hat

Since it seemed a little bare on top, she asked for advice for some kind of finishing detail. She had crocheted a flat flower, complete with multi-colored petals, but that didn’t seem right. Neither did a pom-pom. Either one would have hidden, or at least obscured, the beautiful detail of the decreases on the hat’s crown.

My recommendation was a two-color tassel, which would provide a nice finishing touch while allowing the crown stitching to shine through. Knitting designer and teacher Lisa McFetridge has a helpful video tutorial on how to make a tassel. Lisa was the instructor on last fall’s Sheep Ahoy Knitter’s Cruise. (Doesn’t a Boston – Bermuda cruise in July sound pretty tempting right about now?! Check it out. I believe space is still available.)

Look what a difference this topper makes!

Easy Tassel on Knit Baby Hat

A lovely wee hat

October 11, 2011

When my now-teen children were younger (three under the age of five), a wise neighbor encouraged me to reignite my love of knitting. When I explained how I didn’t have a moment to spare and couldn’t possibly find the time for such an indulgence, she waved my cares away. “That’s exactly why you should knit. You’re at a time in your life when you’re doing the same thing over and over again — making meals, doing laundry, changing diapers — all of it. You need to finish something. Finishing something is a wonderful feeling.”

Once I got over my pique at her complete disregard of what I accomplished in my professional life, I realized she was right. You’re never really finished raising children — at least, not for a decade or two. And finishing a project at work, while an accomplishment, doesn’t always bring a sense of completion because the next item on the to-do list is waiting.

Enter baby hats — endless variety of patterns, made with any variety of yarns and colors, and able to be finished in several hours (or so).

Tomato hat for baby

My dear sister-cousin Meg recently picked up her needles after many years and created this beautiful wee tomato hat for a soon-to-be human.

Seasonal hats are great fun. Babies grow so quickly they’ll only get one season out of any item of clothing, so why not go all out?!

Baby flag hat

Baby pumpkin hat

Knitting Reacquaintance

August 5, 2011

“I’d like to take some time during our visit to get reacquainted with knitting,” my dear cousin Meg wrote in advance of our getaway weekend in Chicago. Her words were music to my ears because there’s nothing a knitter enjoys more (this knitter, at least) than sharing the joy of knitting with others.

I know, I know. It’s not all joy, especially when you discover a dropped stitch 5 rows down or realize that your attempt to “join without twisting” was unsuccessful. But it’s mostly fun and oh so satisfying, especially when you can say “I made this.”

Meg decided on a baby hat, a good choice for a first project since it meets criteria #1 on my list of good first projects : you can finish it. She chose a wee tomato hat — red with a leafy green crown & little stem.

She lives in Toronto, so I sent her to the good folks at Lettuce Knit , which happens to be right in her neighborhood. I know they’re good folks because the Yarn Harlot regularly sings their praises and, well, she wouldn’t lie about a thing like that.

Over the course of our 2.5 days together, she cast on, knit a swatch (important to establish good habits early), figured out her gauge (same as the pattern so no recaculating needed — huzzah!), cast on the hat, divided into 4 double-pointed needles, joined without twisting (no mean feat that), and was well on her way to the 25th round when we had to part.

Unfortunately, I didn’t take a single photo of these wonderful accomplishments. But I’ll see her very soon and perhaps will have one then.

This shot of Meg (with me in the background) at the amazing Cloud Wave sculpture (aka “The Bean”) in Chicago’s Millennium Park will have to do:

Cousin Meg reflected in Cloud Wave metallic sculpture

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