Posts Tagged ‘DPN’

Yoga Socks Off the Needles

June 10, 2018

These little non-sock socks really shouldn’t have taken as long to knit as they did, but there you go. Sometimes life (and knitting) is like that.

The yoga socks are off the needles and into the sink for a bath before blocking (really, just drying).

 

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Fiddly Sticks

June 9, 2018

I’m a big fan and regular user of double-pointed needles (DPNs), especially for socks because then I don’t need stitch markers, but I completely understand how daunting they can appear to knitters and non-knitters alike.

“Fiddly” is the word I use when explaining DPN use to my knitting students. To be sure I’m using it correctly, I looked up the definition: “complicated or detailed and awkward to do or use.” Or, as the good folks at Merriam Webster say, ” requiring an annoying amount of close attention.” Annoying. That sounds about right.

(As an aside, if you’re on Twitter, you really must follow Merriam Webster. You’ll learn and you’ll laugh — and really, couldn’t we all benefit from more of that?!)

At last week’s Knit 101 class, Lisa learned to pick up and knit sleeve stitches using DPNs. And, true to the definition, she found it (annoyingly) fiddly.

“Aaargh, I can’t do this,” she exclaimed after her first stitch. Her first stitch!

DPN-first-try

I encouraged her to breathe and try another stitch, reminding her that she was only knitting with two needles. The other two needles, dangling nearby and holding 2/3 of her stitches, were just hanging out, waiting until she finished with the stitches she was working.

As you can see, she got the hang of it pretty quickly and finished wee sleeve #1.

Baby-sweater-sleeve

Since baby’s arms are so short, a short sleeve was in order. Wish I could remember the yarn she’s using. Isn’t it fun? I’ll look it up and will update soon.

In other DPN news, I’ve started the sleeves on the Sunshine Coast sweater. Now that the warm weather has finally arrived here in the Boston area, it’s time to get this finished.

Sunshine-coast-sleeve

One Down, One to Go

January 30, 2017

Now that I’ve got a sock project on my needles, I realize how much I enjoy knitting them. It took me ages to make my first pair — not to actually make them but to tackle the project. Looking back, I realize that all the features of socks that I loved in that first pair still hold true nearly six years later.

You finish the top ribbing and it’s on to the leg.

felici-sock-yarn-jan-2017

Before you have time to get bored with the rounds of stockinette (or whatever pattern you’ve chosen), it’s on to the heel flap. I’m partial to the Eye of Partridge stitch.

 

striped-sock-knit-heel

Since learning new techniques or patterns is part of what makes knitting so enjoyable, I think I may try a new heel on my next pair. Maybe an After Thought Heel? I like the idea of making a solid colored sock with a contrasting heel and toe. Plus anything created by knitting great Elizabeth Zimmerman must be worth a try.

That’s for another day and another pair. This one — and it is only one at this point — will be my go-to Good, Plain Sock Recipe from the Yarn Harlot.

krd-striped-knit-sock

Kevin, the intended recipient of this pair, has voiced texted his approval: “It looks great!! I like the colors.” It goes without saying that he’d like a pair rather than one, so I’d best cast on the next one lest I be hit with Second Sock Syndrome. Don’t laugh — it’s a thing.

New Socks for the New Year

January 4, 2017

I’ve cast on my first project of 2017 — good old reliable socks. These are in a blue and silver gray colorway, Beyond the Wall, of Felici Sock Yarn.

To be completely candid (and why not be completely candid?), I cast on the first sock in late December but discovered after a few inches that I’d selected a too-large needle. So I ripped it all out, switched to size 1 (2.25mm), and began again. This time I’m using double-pointed needles, which I’ve learned that I prefer to the Magic Loop method. I find the DPNs faster to work with — no fiddly shifting of stitches and moving of the cable.

Do you have a preference for circular knitting? DPNs? two circulars? Magic Loop?

The Thrill of a First Sock

April 30, 2014

There’s something very special about knitting a sock. It’s a simple piece of clothing that’s not particularly visible and endures a lot of wear and (eventually) tear. But the structural components of a sock make it a wonderful challenge even for a beginning knitter. The different parts to a sock provide learning opportunities, a multitude of options for customization, and enough variety that a knitter can’t really get bored.

– circular knitting on double-pointed needles (DPNs), two circulars, or one very long circular (magic loop method)
– ribbing
– construction of a heel flap and gusset
– toe shaping
– grafting the toe using the Kitchener stitch

And that’s just in top-down socks! For a first-time sock knitter, each section and technique can also provide the opportunity for much muttering and lots of occasional cursing.

In yesterday’s knitting class, Bonnie finished her first sock. How great is this?

BonnieSock

first knit sock

Lucky daughter Liza will be the recipient once its pair has been knit. Keeping fingers crossed that Bonnie doesn’t develop a case of Second Sock Syndrome.

Back to Class

October 14, 2013

I’m so pleased to be teaching again! For the past two Wednesday mornings, a group of 8 intrepid women has gathered around the table and dived into knitting.  The two hours fly by — at least, for me.

Most of the students have knit before — some many years ago, some intermittently, some just starting. Nearly all want to learn how to fix mistakes since that’s why many of them stop a project. They realize they’ve done something wrong but don’t know how to remedy and move on. Reading a pattern is also high on the list of goals.

Seema had never held a pair of needles, so her task for the first two weeks was to become familiar with the feel of the needles and yarn: holding them without gripping, working yarn in the fingers of her right hand, shoulders relaxed. Explaining and demonstrating for her made me realize how much of this is second nature to someone who has the “muscle memory” of the craft.

By the second class, Seema cast on an entire 30 stitches and was moving on to her second row of what would most likely become a cotton washcloth.

IMG_2652

Amy arrived at the second class with a nearly-finished hat, but she needed to switch to double-pointed needles (DPNs) for the top of the crown. DPNs can be daunting since there are several (4 or 5) and full of points (8 or 10!). But once you realize that you still only knit with two needles at a time while the other needle(s) are holding places for extra stitches, you can focus on those two needles and not get too freaked out about what’s hanging out on the other needles.

Amy had no trouble making the switch and decreasing to her final five stitches. A few minutes later, after cutting the working yarn and running it through those final stitches, tightening, and weaving in the ends. Lo and behold, a lovely multi-colored, rolled brim hat!

IMG_2656

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