Posts Tagged ‘finished’

How to Light a Fire Under a Knitter

May 26, 2017

Most of my afternoon knitting sessions with tween girls consist of a lively mix of joke telling, spontaneous singing and dancing, high volume stories of school, sports, and friends, and occasional knitting. I’ll often knit a row or round for every one they knit.

However, this week, I unconsciously threw down the knitting gauntlet (after all, who can knit with a gauntlet?!) and the results were remarkable. A couple of weeks ago, they’d started garter stitch headbands. Because she’d started earlier, Ella was a few inches ahead of Brigid, and I commented that she could probably finish that afternoon. “Do you think I’ll finish today?” asked Brigid. “I doubt it,” I replied.

Boom! The race began. United in their indignation that I’d doubted their abilities and ready for the challenge, their fingers flew. Progress was measured every two or three minutes.

Headband-measure

They helped each other with the decreases and i-cord. Ella was first to bind off.

Headband-bind-off

While she dashed off to change for lacrosse practice, Brigid zipped through the final few inches and sewed the ends together.

“YOU didn’t think we could do it, and we DID!” Delighted in their victory, they agreed to hold still for a photo.

B&E-headbands

They’re so awesome. I never doubted them for a minute!

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Soft, Color-Shifting Cowl

January 19, 2016

After promising an update when I finished my second Chromatic Cowl, I completely forgot to post the finished product!

In the intervening week or two since my back seat knitting, I completed the cowl and grafted the two ends together with the Kitchener stitch. I must be doing something wrong with my provisional cast-on because I ended up with an uneven number of stitches — fewer on the provisional/waste yarn end. However, I cast on one a couple and grafted.

Blocking, as usual, was a tepid bath in the sink.

chromatic_bath

Drying this airy creation took only a couple of hours. Although I’m not thrilled with the similar color values of the dark gray and hunter green, I love the gradual colors changes.

chromatic-cowl-green

 

chromatic-cowl-neck

 

Curlers in Her Hair

June 8, 2015

For the past few months, I’ve been monogamous in my knitting, working on Michael’s sweater with the hope of finishing it by Memorial Day, when it’s still cool here in Massachusetts. The sweater is finished, but it’s not done. But that’s a story for another day….

In the aftermath of finishing/not-finishing, I’ve cast on two smaller projects, neither of which will have size issues.

Last fall, I bought a skein of Kidding Ewe by Done Roving Yarns at Bee’s in Bar Harbor, Maine. “Cherries Jubilee” is a yummy mix of reds, purples, and greens that will make a lovely cowl or, in this case, a wimple.

First 2 inches of Old Shale Wimple

Yes, “Maria” has been running through my brain.

Second project: “A Good, Plain Sock” in Berroco Sox. This pair for Patrick, who casually commented that I’d knit socks for everyone in the family except him.

Good plain sock recipe

What’s on your needles these days?

 

 

 

A Knitting Palette Cleanser

January 23, 2015

Just as when enjoying a big, complex meal, sometimes a knitter needs to cleanse her palette with something refreshing. I’m working on a sweater for Michael and am nearly done the second sleeve. But a couple of nights ago, I had the urge to finish something  — anything.

An early Valentine decoration fit the bill. Using DPNs and some of the red yarn for the sweater, I finished the first side in about 15 minutes. After soaking and blocking (I know, not totally necessary but I’m a creature of habit), I had this lovely wee thing.

small red knit heart

The next day, I knit its pair and, after a refresher on the blanket stitch, finished.

Finished small knit red heart

Aaaah, that felt good.

Virtual High-Five

August 15, 2013

There are many pleasures to finishing a project:

  • being able to wear or use the completed item;
  • knowing that someone else will be able to wear or use the completed item;
  • anticipation of the gift-giving;
  • moving on to another project (there’s always another project!);

And then there’s the joy in sharing your finished creation with other knitters, who have an understanding of the skill and effort that you put into the piece and who can “ooh,” “aah,” and applaud the details — yarn color and texture, stitches, patterns, tension (the good kind).

Friend and fellow knitting cruise pal Cathie finished a bee-yoo-ti-ful square shawl last week — all by herself, in a bar. Before you picture a solitary knitter, boozing it up in a dingy bar somewhere, please know I’m quite sure that she was in a lovely lounge and waiting for a couple of friends to arrive. At least that’s what she wrote on her phone in the note that accompanied this photo of said shawl. (Pattern is Traffic Furniture by Ann Weaver)

CathieSquareShawl

Cathie wrote, “OK, I’m in a bar…but there’s no law against knitting in a bar – as you know. The problem is this … I’m waiting for friend and just finished the shawl. No one was recording, taking pictures and the only cheer was in my head.  I clearly have to block it but …. anyway …. I’m wishing you guys were here.”

Can you relate? How about a virtual high-five for Cathie and her shawl?

 

Surprisingly finished.

July 22, 2013

The Illusion Cube blanket is more than I thought it’d be. I knew the design was dead clever — 56 individual hexagons, each knit to look like a cube.

IllusionCubeCloseup

I knew the colors would be surprisingly lovely. Eight colors, each pair knitted twice in slightly different combination.

IllusionCubeFinished

Sure, each cube had about six ends to weave in and snip, making the back side a bit bumpy.

back side of Illusion Cube blanket

But I’m still delightfully surprised and pleased with the finished product.

I knew when I started this project, that this would be a gift for the child of neighborhood friends. Daisy was born when I was about 3/4 of the way through the cubes, the much-anticipated and greatly loved sister of big brothers Ben and Mookie and blessed child of Kerrie and Steve. The Yarn Harlot has said that knitting is “the best container for love.” I hope Miss Daisy is wrapped in love, in the form of this blanket and the less physical but no less tangible love of friends and family, for years to come.

Finished Illusion Cube Blanket over porch railing

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