Posts Tagged ‘fix’

Lovely Afghan Seeks Owner

May 15, 2017

OK, this is embarrassing, but I’ve got to ask: Does this afghan look familiar?

Orphan-afghan

This hefty, cozy afghan has been in my house since October for a while, and I can’t for the life of me remember who brought it to me. In response to one of my knitting class notices, a woman contacted me to ask if I could mend an afghan that her late mother had knit.

Sure I can fix it, I replied confidently. She delivered the afghan to my house. I told her that I’d have it mended in a few weeks. She went home. The afghan sat on a table for about a month before I mended the broken seams, wove in a dozen or so ends, and gave it a nice bath and blocking.

When I went to email the owner to let her know her heirloom treasure was fixed, I couldn’t find her contact information. Anywhere.

“Did you check everywhere in your email?” well-meaning friends have asked. “Of course, I did” I shout in frustration reply. I’ve searched and searched and searched. Nothing.

My only consolation — which really isn’t much — is that the afghan owner (Brenda? Barbara?) has lost my contact information, too.

So I’m swallowing my pride and asking for any and all help from knitters and non-knitters alike, here in Newton, Massachusetts, and around the globe. Please share this post and photo and help reunite this beautiful handknit with its family.

Here it is again (just in case you misplaced the first photo) ;-)

Orphan-afghan

Throw Me a Lifeline (or Two)

June 17, 2015

Knitters won’t be surprised to learn that the definition of “lifeline” in most dictionaries, paper and digital, does not include this handy technique that has saved the life of many a knitter. FIguratively, not literally, of course.

But learning how to use a lifeline can enable you to finish a project, thereby “saving the life” of the project, and that should count for something! Last year, when the cuff of a sock was too tight for the intended wearer, a lifeline allowed me to cut off the offending section, pick up stitches, and make a new cuff.

In the past week, I’ve used lifelines to rescue two projects, Michael’s finished-but-not-done sweater and the recently started Old Shale Wimple.

Michael’s sweater is about two inches too short. It’s also too tight across the chest, but that’s a more complicated issue to be dealt with at another time. Rather than tear out the ribbing around the bottom of the sweater bit by bit — too slow and painstaking a task for me — I wove a strand of white yarn into a row above the ribbing, catching each stitch.

Creating a knitting lifeline by  inserting yarn into each stitch of row

With that row firmly held by the lifeline, I cut the ribbing off the sweater.

yarn lifeline holds row of stitches

And then picked up each of the stitches held by the lifeline. I picked off the extra bits of yarn from the ribbing side, so the stitches on the needle were ready to be worked. I’ll need to add two inches to the body of the sweater and then add the ribbing.

pick up each stitch from the knitting lifeline

The wimple’s rescue was similar but was necessitated by my carelessness in following (i.e., not following) the pattern. I’ll save the specifics of that adventure for another post, but here are the steps of the wimple lifeline.

lifeline inserted in knitting

picking up stitches with knitting lifeline

Learning how to fix mistakes is the key to finishing projects. And I’m getting lots of practice these days!

Piecing it all together

July 11, 2013

By the time I’d finished each piece of the Illusion Cube blanket, I’d knit more than the required 56 hexagons. There were a few mistakes along the way — duplicates of color combos, short-sided “cubes” (at least two of those). But finally, I was ready:

56 knitted hexagons for blanket

Sewing it all together seemed pretty easy-peasy as I started. The blanket is stitched together in quasi-stripes — based on the border colors of the hexagonal pieces (don’t you love that word?!). I was so pleased with the first 1 1/2 rows that I captured the progress in a photo.

Beginning row of stitched blanket

Wait a minute — THAT doesn’t look right. The colors were lovely but something about the stripes caught my eye — and not in a good way.

Blanket pieces sewn together at wrong angles

Fortunately I hadn’t gone too far with the second row. So I snipped and un-sewed, laid the whole thing out on the table, and placed each piece in the correct spot. And started sewing again.

THAT doesn’t look right…. (take 2)

June 23, 2013

As I’ve noted before, there’s no such thing as a knitter who doesn’t make mistakes. Learning to spot mistakes and figuring out how to correct them is something every knitter must do. If you don’t, you’ll end up frozen — confronted with a mistake that you’re unable to fix and unable to continue your project.

In the course of knitting the pieces — all 56 of them — for the Illusion Cube Blanket, I’ve made multiple mistakes. Sometimes I’ve spotted the mistake right away and been able to correct it with relatively little effort. Like forgetting to switch colors and realizing that I’ve knit four rows of periwinkle instead of two.

Another kind of mistake sneaks up on you. You think you’ve finished a cube just fine until you look carefully and realize there’s something not quite right. Like this:

AppleMagentaCube

It wasn’t until I took a photo of these two cubes, made with the same colors but in different combinations, that I spotted my mistake. Do you see it?

CubeShortSide-20130622-112705.jpg

There should be 5 stripes of the alternate (non-border) color on each side of the cube. In this one, I’d only knit four.

While sorting and counting the cubes I’d completed, I discovered a couple more that had mistakes.

CubeMistakes-1

But, I hear you asking, what do you DO when you find a mistake? Do you have to correct it? Or in this case, make new cubes with the proper number of stripes?

The answer depends on your preference. There are no knitting police or inspectors who will check your work and mark you down for errors. What do YOU want to do about it? How daunting is the correction? How will YOU feel when you look at your finished project — will the error seem glaring to you even if no one else can see it without your pointing it out? Do you care?

For me, for this project, I decided to knit new cubes with the proper number of stripes and correctly matched borders. After all, when you’re knitting 56 lovely striped cubes, what’s 3 or 4 more?!

 

 

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