Posts Tagged ‘heel’

Student Socks

March 14, 2019

If you’ve been reading this blog for even a short while, you know how much I enjoy teaching others how to knit. And I really love when my students — who by now are friends — send photos of their latests projects.

Like me, Judy spends a lot of time with her elderly parents, often with her knitting close at hand, at doctor’s offices, the hair salon, physical therapy appointments, or just being present at home. Socks are her go-to project for all the reasons you’d expect — portability being the most obvious.

Last week, she texted for help after turning the heel. See what she did here?

She knit when she should have purled — and vice versa. It’s not uncommon at all when knitting in the round — or one-sided like this heel — to pick up your needles and knit in the wrong direction. The result is purl bumps on the wrong side. Solution? TINK back those stitches and double check that you’re purling on the inside and knitting on the outside.

That’s what Judy did, and soon she was on her way — with sock in hand(s) on the bus to the airport.

Like I said, socks are uber-portable. I love the colors of the self-striping yarn that she’s using. My guess is that she’ll gift the socks to someone since they’re mid-calf length, not knee highs, which is her preferred length for herself.

There was no knitting in the next photo that Judy sent, but I’m pretty sure the sock was tucked away just out of the camera’s view.

If only I could have made a knitting beach house call….

The Thrill of a First Sock

April 30, 2014

There’s something very special about knitting a sock. It’s a simple piece of clothing that’s not particularly visible and endures a lot of wear and (eventually) tear. But the structural components of a sock make it a wonderful challenge even for a beginning knitter. The different¬†parts to a sock provide learning opportunities, a multitude of options for customization, and enough variety that a knitter can’t really get bored.

– circular knitting on double-pointed needles (DPNs), two circulars, or one very long circular (magic loop method)
– ribbing
–¬†construction of a heel flap and gusset
– toe shaping
– grafting the toe using the Kitchener stitch

And that’s just in top-down socks! For a first-time sock knitter, each section and technique can also provide the opportunity for much muttering and lots of occasional cursing.

In yesterday’s knitting class, Bonnie finished her first sock. How great is this?

BonnieSock

first knit sock

Lucky daughter Liza will be the recipient once its pair has been knit. Keeping fingers crossed that Bonnie doesn’t develop a case of Second Sock Syndrome.

Sock Travels

January 21, 2014

While you could hardly say that I lead a jet set life, I’ve had my share of short, turn-around flights over the past few years. Most were work-related as I traveled between Boston and Philadelphia to a client, generally flying down and back in the same day although sometimes with an overnight. Since I finished that piece of work, I’ve not had the occasion to travel much.

Hannah’s role in a musical at a community theatre in North Carolina this month provided me and my Mom the chance to take a brief trip for Friday’s opening night performance. My latest sock (Berroco Sox in Red Multi) joined us. On the flight to Raleigh-Durham, I knit a few inches plus the heel flap.

TravelingSock

The show, 9 to 5: The Musical, was very well done. You’ll have to take my word for it, especially since photos were prohibited and no reviews are out. And, of course, Hannah was terrific. Yes, I’m biased but I know talent when I see it!

When we arrived at the airport Saturday morning, we discovered our flight was delayed two hours because of snow in Boston. One of the great things about knitting is the way it transforms waiting into something enjoyable — or at least distracts the knitter from some of the frustration of waiting. The heel was turned and gusset begun.

TravelingSockHeel

The time-transforming power of knitting was tested a bit when the pilot announced, as we were second in line to take off, that the Boston airport had gone into a “ground delay” and that we’d be waiting for another hour before we left the ground. And he kindly thanked us for our patience, to which Mom said, “Do we have a choice?” She didn’t have her knitting — just a book, one apparently without time-transforming powers.

What really matters is we made it home safe and sound, if somewhat later than expected, AND with a close-to-finished sock as a souvenir (of sorts).

IMG_2999

 

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