Posts Tagged ‘i-cord’

When in Doubt

December 19, 2018

A few weeks ago, my friend Barbara asked for help adding an i-cord edge to the bulky seed stitch blanket she’d knit for her grandson, a first-year college student. (Purl Soho’s Eleventh Hour Marled Blanket) Naturally, I was happy to help. If only it’d been so simple.

After following my directions, she wasn’t pleased with the final result — the blanket wouldn’t lie flat and was somewhat pulled in along the edge — and asked again for some assistance. When I got the blanket home, I realized that I’d given her the wrong instructions for making the i-cord border.

I thought of my Mom’s frequent saying, “When in doubt, read the instructions.” If only I’d thought of it before I’d “helped” her!

I removed the wonky i-cord border, evened out some of the yarn joins, washed the edge-less blanket, and blocked it on Hannah’s bed.

knit blanket blocking on bed

While it dried, I reviewed a few video tutorials on how to do a proper i-cord edge. It’s remarkable what a difference a bit of knowledge makes!

attach i-cord edge to blanket

Not surprisingly, the new edge looked much better than the previous version. It was, after all, a true i-cord edge.

close up of i-cord edge

It’s more a throw than a full-sized blanket, but I’m quite confident it’s plenty big enough to wrap one very lucky young man in the love of his grandmother.

eleventh hour marled blanket

As for my own projects, I’ve turned the heel and completed the gusset on the second sock. While I’m feeling confident that I’ll time to finish by Christmas morning, I’m beginning to wonder if I actually have enough yarn….

knitting sock heel gusset

Bermudiana Shawl Done!

August 25, 2015

Shawls always take longer than I expect. This shouldn’t come as a surprise since I’ve knit quite a few, but each time I’m reminded of just how long it takes to knit the several hundred stitches that make up a good “wrappable” shawl. How many stitches? For the Bermudiana, it was 463 — back and forth and back and forth and…

But now that the ends are woven in and the whole thing is blocked (a full-water block — I’m committed), I must say it’s lovely.

finished Bermudiana Shawl displayed on porch railing

I learned a few new things with this project: how to add beads (using a tiny crochet hook) and the i-cord bind-off. If you look very closely, you can see the gold beads in the lace “flowers” on the edge. They’d stand out better if I’d used the correct yarn for the lace edge, but I didn’t. Many thanks to friend Shelley, queen of the Sheep Ahoy Knitter’s Cruise, for giving me some of her yarn.

lace edge of Bermudiana shawl showing beads

The pattern called for an i-cord bind-off, so that’s what I did. Not sure I’d do that again soon. I’m not sure how much stability it adds and it’s a slow bind-off, which seems somehow unfair. By the time you get to the “I’m ready to bind off” part of a project, you’re ready to be done — and quickly. But I like learning and trying new techniques, so I stuck with it. Glad I did (even though I wasn’t so sure while doing it!).close up of i-cord bind-off along edge of Bermudiana Shawl

%d bloggers like this: