Posts Tagged ‘Madeline Tosh’

Good Day for a Baby Sweater

March 24, 2017

I haven’t knit anything baby-ish in a while, but the Gidday Baby sweater (Tosh DK in Leopard and Maple Leaf) and reminds me how enjoyable such projects can be. Starting with the first few rows of garter stitch in alternating colors, I was hooked.

gidday-baby-sweater-neck

My recent spate of travels gave me lots of opportunities to work on the sweater — with the exception of my ill-fated Kentucky trip during which I found myself without the necessary next ball of yarn. In case anyone’s still wondering, my suitcase did arrive at the hotel — about an hour before I checked out and headed for flight back to Boston. Better late than never and all that.

Once I’d cast off and woven in the few ends that remained, I tossed the sweater into the sink for a pre-block soak. I’m a full-water blocker, preferring it to steaming, assuming that I’ve got the time, which I generally do. After I patted it into shape, I left it in the sunshine for a while.

Gidday-blocking

Something was missing, namely a couple of tiny buttons to hold the yoke together. So the sweater and I spent about 15 minutes at a nearby yarn store trying on different buttons before deciding on these stylish, square-ish pair.

Gidday-baby-sweater-buttons

It’s all come together quite nicely, and I’m looking forward to walking it down the street to my newest neighbor.

Gidday-baby-sweater

 

 

Tropical Salad Shawl

July 6, 2016

The colors of the Madeline Tosh yarn that I purchased in Ontario grabbed me from the moment I saw it at The Little Red Mitten. Even though they aren’t colors that I wear at all very often — yellow and orange aren’t very flattering on my Celtic looks — I knew I’d buy it. A fruit salad of mango, cantaloupe, honeydew, and papaya: the perfect combination for a rectangular wrap across the shoulders. I usually take a photo of the label so I’ll recall the name and colorway. Alas, no such luck this time!

The drive back from a glorious weekend with two Sister-Friends was the opportunity I needed to bind off.

DropStitch_shawl_backseat

Back home, I plopped it into the sink for a good long soak before blocking. I discovered the magic of blocking quite a few years ago and now soak and block every wooly item. Washing is a definite “must” after you’ve carried a project around with you for weeks.

DropStitch_shawl_soak

And once you’ve soaked, squeezed (gently, of course), and rinsed, you might as well block. I was hoping to lengthen this shawl (or is it a wrap?) a couple of inches — both to highlight the lovely dropped-stitch waves but also to ensure that it’d be long enough to really wrap around my shoulders. I’d only bought one skein and wasn’t really following a pattern. Risky, I know, but worth it.

DropStitch_Shawl

%d bloggers like this: