Posts Tagged ‘socks’

Help Needed for Too-Short Sock

May 9, 2019

So I’ve got a bit of a sock dilemma. I made the leg of the first Lord Varys sock too short. The most likely reason is that I was sick of checking the pattern chart each round and wanted to get to the heel — my favorite part of any sock.

Don’t misunderstand: I’m pleased with how it looks – nice twists that are still visible with the blue-brown color changes. Yarn is “Missandei” from Bumblebee Acres Farms’ Game of Thrones-inspired collection.

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But it doesn’t go far enough up the leg. I’m not the one who’ll be wearing it, so my comfort level doesn’t matter here.

So I’ve made the leg of the second sock another inch or so longer. This one is progressing much faster since I’ve got the pattern memorized and don’t need to consult the chart.

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I don’t want to end up with socks of two different lengths, so my question is, how do I remedy this without starting over with sock #1?

My proposed solution involves:

  • putting in a lifeline at the end of the cuff
  • separating the cuff from rest of the sock
  • picking up the cuff stitches and knitting an inch or so of leg

And then what? I know grafting will be involved, but I’ve never grafted live stitches together (aside from a sock toe).

How does one graft live stitches in the round together? I’m OK with not doing it in pattern – a row of knit stitches will hardly be noticed.

Any and all advice and tips would be MOST appreciated.

WIP Wednesday: Not What You Expect

April 3, 2019

Work in Progress (WIP) is shorthand among crafters for a current project, something that you’re knitting, sewing, painting, making. The understanding in sharing updates on WIPs is that progress is being made — that you’re another step or so closer to finishing.

#WIPWednesday is a chance to share such progress — for example, a sock that now has a heel and part of a gusset.

Knit sock showing heel and gusset

I’ve said before that part of what I love about knitting is finishing. This is especially true when the rest of life is filled with repetitive undertakings that can seem never ending.

Yet some of those WIPs are the most valuable. Take this little guy, a Work in Progress of the highest order.

Young William arrived a couple of weeks ago, and, according to his completely smitten (and very wise) grandmother Pat, his favorite snuggly item is her most recent project — this lovely blanket.

Baby wrapped in knit blanket and lying on man’s lap

GoT Socks?

April 2, 2019

I’m not a convert to toe-up socks, but learning several new techniques — and practicing my ripping out and reknitting skills — made the Frasier Fir Socks worth the effort.

two green knit socks hanging on sock blocking frames

The tree (or is it a branch?) detail along the leg is particularly charming. I may incorporate it into a hat some day — or maybe along the back of mittens. The yarn color is more true in this detail than the one above.

detail of pattern along leg of green knit socks

Even before I’d finished the Frasier Firs, my fingers and mind were eager to cast on something new with the lovely Game of Thrones-inspired yarn from Bumblebee Acres.

Keeping with my theme of trying new things and going full steam ahead into the GoT mode, I searched Ravelry for a similarly-inspired sock pattern. As usual, the Ravelry community did not disappoint.

Not being at all familiar with Game of Thrones, I have no idea if the yarn (Brienne of Tarth colorway) is compatible in a literary sense with the House Greyjoy pattern. But I really like the cables and twists.

All the twists and cables make it seem quite small — perhaps too narrow for the leg of the intended recipient — but I’m quite sure that it’ll fit. At least, it “fits” my arm when I’ve tried it on.

The irony is not lost on me that one of the benefits of toe-up socks is that you can try them on as you go, something that’s much more difficult with my favorite top-down socks on DPNs. I’m nothing if not consistent in my routines!

Student Socks

March 14, 2019

If you’ve been reading this blog for even a short while, you know how much I enjoy teaching others how to knit. And I really love when my students — who by now are friends — send photos of their latests projects.

Like me, Judy spends a lot of time with her elderly parents, often with her knitting close at hand, at doctor’s offices, the hair salon, physical therapy appointments, or just being present at home. Socks are her go-to project for all the reasons you’d expect — portability being the most obvious.

Last week, she texted for help after turning the heel. See what she did here?

She knit when she should have purled — and vice versa. It’s not uncommon at all when knitting in the round — or one-sided like this heel — to pick up your needles and knit in the wrong direction. The result is purl bumps on the wrong side. Solution? TINK back those stitches and double check that you’re purling on the inside and knitting on the outside.

That’s what Judy did, and soon she was on her way — with sock in hand(s) on the bus to the airport.

Like I said, socks are uber-portable. I love the colors of the self-striping yarn that she’s using. My guess is that she’ll gift the socks to someone since they’re mid-calf length, not knee highs, which is her preferred length for herself.

There was no knitting in the next photo that Judy sent, but I’m pretty sure the sock was tucked away just out of the camera’s view.

If only I could have made a knitting beach house call….

Striped Socks in Pairs

January 20, 2019

I don’t set New Year’s resolutions, knitting or otherwise. Occasionally, I’ll send an intention, often vague, into the universe — “try not to worry so much” or “live more mindfully” or “don’t buy new yarn until you’ve used at least as much from your stash.”

Just kidding about that last one.

But even though I’ve not set a “sock of the month” goal, I’m quite pleased and a bit surprised that my first socks of 2019 are knit and blocked.

Yarn is Patons Kroy Sock in Blue Striped Ragg with contrasting toe and heel in an anonymous yarn from aforementioned stash. They’re now wrapped in tissue paper and tucked away for someone special.

Those of you who’ve been with me for a while have seen a few of friend Judy’s socks, starting with her very first sock about five years ago when she took my knitting class. She’s made many pairs since, including this lovely pair of knee socks (her preferred length for her own socks), which she modeled at the gym this week.

She’s puzzled — and a bit bothered — by the relative droopiness of the left one, but since they’re knee socks, no one will know. Except you, of course, and I know you won’t say a thing.

Scrolling with Socks

January 8, 2019

When I finished the helix striped hat, I realized that I didn’t have another project ready to cast on. This shouldn’t have been a surprise since I’m the one who decides. I knew I hadn’t selected what to make next, but somehow, I was a tad surprised. Go figure.

So I did what I usually do when I’m between projects: I tossed some sock yarn and DPNs into my bag and cast on a sock when I got to Mom’s for the afternoon. As I worked the first few rounds, I had a bit of an epiphany — casting on a sock is a bit like scrolling Instagram or Twitter. When I find myself in a temporary lull in knitting activity, I turn to socks.

Here’s the latest: self-striping Patons Kroy sock yarn in Blue Striped Ragg.

To add a bit of variety, I decided to make a contrasting heel and toe, something new for me. Since I couldn’t find any suitable matching yarn in my stash, I used a ball of maroon fingering of indeterminate origin.

When I’d finished the flap and turned the heel, I decided that it just wouldn’t do. The yarn was too thin, which would make for a less durable heel. See the gaps among the stitches?

I ripped out the flap and decided to try knitting with two strands of the maroon fingering. It was a bit bulky, but I’d rather have a too sturdy heel than one that wears through too soon.

It’s almost time to start shaping the toe. While I don’t know the exact measurement of the recipient’s foot, I have an approximation — about an inch or so longer than mine. I think.

I really like the look and feel of this yarn and just may use it to make a sweater for a baby-to-be who’s due to arrive this spring. If you’ve got a pattern idea, please let me know in the comments.

Socks Received

December 8, 2018

Kevin’s first final exam of his senior year is later today — fluid dynamics (or is it dynamic fluids?!) So I was relieved to learn that the good-luck socks I mailed earlier this week had arrived — and more importantly, that he was glad to have received them.

smiling selfie with socks held to cheek

text message: They're so soft!!! Thank you momma - heart emoji

I know, as my wise sister-in-law would say, “smart is not something you are but something you become” and that handknit socks don’t have a direct effect one one’s mastery of mechanical engineering, but if this pair of cozy socks provides a bit of comfort and confidence to this remarkable young man, that’d be wonderful.

In the meantime, I’ve been working on his next pair, to be opened on Christmas morning, when final exams are finished and the next semester’s work has yet to begin.

sock-toe-shape

May the Force be with you, dear boy. And may your efforts be rewarded.

 

 

WIP Wednesday: Socks in a Flash

December 5, 2018

On Monday, after learning that Kevin’s first final exam will be this Saturday, I raided my stash of Christmas socks and mailed a pair to him. As he knows, the academic benefits of handknit socks haven’t been scientifically proven, but it certainly can’t hurt to have your feet wrapped in love and know that you’ve got a big fan in your corner. Right?

Of course, that meant that I needed to knit another pair of socks for Christmas. 

A morning trip to the hair salon provided time for knitting. You can see the crimps and crinkles in the yarn, leftover from its previous incarnation (a failed toe-up sock experiment). I expect blocking will ease that out entirely.

I knit several more inches at Mom’s in the afternoon as we listened to Ella Fitzgerald and Louis Armstrong on CD (her favorites). She’s making great progress on her latest garter stitch scarf.

The yarn is really yummy: Junkyarn‘s “Tini” colorway. The bright flecks of color never fail to delight Mom, who holds them up and exclaims, “look at this!” 

If I’d been tasked with naming this colorway, I would have selected “Peppermint Stick,” since it reminds me of the peppermint stick ice cream at my favorite island soda counter.

 

Smoother Sock Toes

November 27, 2018

It’s no secret that I love to knit socks. Although it took me ages to take the plunge, I’ve almost always had one on the needles as a second (or third) project, especially when I need something portable. 

My latest pair is made with a vibrant skein of Lady Dye’s Superwash Fingering (can’t recall the colorway).  

knit socks in sink before blocking

The Yarn Harlot’s Good Plain Sock Recipe continues to be my go-to pattern, but I’ve discovered a new technique that makes the toe graft smoother.

Top-down socks need to have the toes “closed” by grafting, rather than by seaming, which would create an uncomfortable lumpy edge in one’s shoe. I’ve always used the Kitchener stitch but had never been able to achieve an invisible graft — there was always a bit of a line. See? 

The recipients of my socks didn’t seem to mind at all. In fact, some say they are “real juju” especially when facing academic challenges. But I was still on out the look out for a better technique.

And I found one, thanks to the TECHknitter. Instead of using a darning needle to graft the two sides together, you use a double-pointed needle. It shouldn’t make a difference since the grafting yarn is traveling in the same way. But it made a remarkable difference for me — a smooth, truly seamless toe. 

I always feel so clever when I learn something new!

Socks are blocked, dry, and tucked away for someone (still haven’t figured out who though).

two finished knit socks

 

 

 

 

Something New Every Day

September 20, 2018
Part of what I love about knitting is the opportunity to learn something new — whether it be a new stitch, discovering the magic of blocking,  or figuring out how to make a too-small sweater bigger.  For at least a year, I’ve been saying (mostly to myself) that I want to learn how to crochet. Yesterday, I bit the bullet.
And boy, did it feel fiddly! The chain stitch cast on was a piece of cake, but it took me ages (well, a bunch of minutes) to figure out how to hold the working yarn, stitches, and hook. The experience gave me new appreciation for the challenges of my beginner knitting students. I discovered, pleasantly but not surprisingly, that the process began to feel easier with practice. It’s what I tell novice knitters and turns out, it’s right! I started with a basic square of single crochet using a bit of leftover cotton yarn from my stash.
I can’t yet “read” the stitches very well. Sure, I can see a couple of spots that don’t look right, but I have no idea what went wrong nor how to fix them. That’s going to take some more practice. I felt so delighted with this little accomplishment that I decided I should dive into a pattern. Ha! Lessons learned: don’t try to learn a new skill after 9pm nor after a glass of wine. My next step will be to learn a few more basic stitches like double crochet or half-double crochet (what?!) before attempting an actual project. Any suggestions for a beginner crochet project that doesn’t involve granny squares? Back in the knitting world, I’ve just finished the first Vanilla Latte sock. Yarn is Urth Merino Sock, colorway 2018. The person who’ll receive these for Christmas has bigger feet than I do, so even though I used my foot as a rough gauge, I continued a bit longer before shaping the toe.

New Normal for Now

September 14, 2018

I’m happy to report that Mom’s been home for a few weeks and has regained her pre-pneumonia strength and balance. It helped that she was quite fit before she was hospitalized and that we walked with her around the hospital floor several times a day whether she wanted to or not.

Last week, we introduced a couple of home health aides who help five days each week so brother Luke and I can maintain our work lives, sanity, and marriages. We also consider it an insurance policy of sorts so that neither of us is overwhelmed if the other gets sick, has a major work obligation, or wants to take a day trip or — gasp — vacation.

The transition and adjustment has been blessedly smooth. The aides are professional, kind, and experienced. Although she’s sometimes confused about why they’re there, Mom has welcomed them into her home and life quite readily.

A few days ago, she agreed to return to the hair salon, a short walk down the hill, after refusing to go for several weeks. The wonderful staff were pleased to see her and told her so. While her hair was washed, cut, and styled, I resumed my usual seat by the window and worked a few rounds of the Vanilla Latte sock.

Sock-salon

Yarn is Urth Merino Sock, colorway 2018, a mix of bright blues, greens, and oranges.

We spend a fair bit of time each day knitting. I don’t like to even think of the day that she forgets how to do the knit stitch. Having finished two garter stitch scarves, Mom has started another one in a lovely creamy white. I cast on 30 stitches, and she’s taken it from there.

mom-knits

Yesterday, we were joined — remotely — by my friend Judy, who reported that she was back in the knitting routine, too. From her home about 60 miles away, she sent an update via text.

striped-sock-judy

I believe the yarn is Diversity from Plymouth Yarn (Zebra colorway). Pretty sure I was with her when she bought it.

She makes knee socks while I prefer mid-calf or just below. If you’re a sock knitter, what’s your preference?

 

 

 

Duo of Finished Objects

August 5, 2018

I try not to set too many knitting goals for myself, but sometimes a knitter has to do what she has to do. And I must admit that I’m quite pleased to have achieved my vacation knitting goal of completing two projects.

Since they had a true deadline — birthdays are exact dates after all — the Monkey Socks were my top priority. A couple of people have asked about the significance of the name. The simple truth is that it’s the name of the pattern by Cookie, available on Ravelry and on Knitty.

On the 26th and final repeat of the 11 row pattern, I finally committed it to memory. A relatively quick toe shaping and seaming and then into a pot of sudsy water.

They dried quickly in the sunshine and were tucked away for the birthday girl.

Yarn is Flying Finn Yarns one-of-a-kind (OOAK) that I bought at J.P. Knit & Stitch’s reopening a few months ago. I just love the subtle color variations.

At that point there was no way to avoid the Sunshine Coast sweater anymore. As I explained earlier, I had a bit of an emotional hurdle to overcome on that one. But finish I did, and I’m delighted to report that I’m delighted with the final product.

On the ferry back to the mainland, I started my next project, a Baby Vertebrae frontless cardigan for a friend’s baby-to-be, who’s expected to make an appearance in early September.

baby-vertebrae-ferry

Since I’ve now got only one WIP, I feel free to cast on something else. I’ve got time, right? Unlike birthdays, baby due dates aren’t exact — until they become birthdays, of course!

 

 

 

Socks on a train

July 2, 2018

Has anyone seen June? It was just here, but now it’s gone!

Patrick and I had a marvelous weekend in New York City, the highlight of which was seeing Hannah perform in her first cabaret. More on that in a future post.

For today, here’s the start of Monkey Sock #2, heading east along southern Connecticut.

It’s knitting up faster now that I’ve got the hang of the pattern. I still need to read each line of the 12-round repeats, but all I need is a glance.

My knitting goal this week is to finish the Sunshine Coast sweater – just one sleeve to go. What’s up with you this week?

Monkeying Around

June 29, 2018

Based on comments from my last post, there’s a lot of folks who’d like to see more of the Monkey Socks (or, given the state of my progress, the Monkey Sock). Socks are my go-to knitting project, especially when I’m traveling since they’re easy to stuff tuck into a bag.

So a couple of weeks ago, as dear Jenn and I headed to Martha’s Vineyard for a quick visit to our sister-friend Kate, new owner of an awesome toy store on the island, I cast on a sock.

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While I’ve curbed my yarn-buying activity a fair bit recently, I make an exception for sock yarn. Unlike that scrumptious skein of DK weight merino or chunky baby alpaca, I know exactly what I’ll make with 400 yards of sock yarn.

I love the almost neutral, subtle color changes in this luscious skein from Flying Finn Yarns. It called out for something other than my usual Good Plain Sock Recipe, so I searched for a pattern with some texture and detail.

Monkey Socks (free from Knitty) caught my eye, with curves and weaves and a little bit of lace. Fear not, just a few yarn overs here and there. I like the addition of the twisted rib at the cuff — just to shake things up a bit from a traditional K1 P1 ribbing.

monkey-socks-salon

I made the heel flap in Eye of Partridge instead of the plain stockinette called for in the pattern.

monkey-socks-heel

The pattern continues all along the top of the foot until the toe. Good thing my feet were clean in this shot!

monkey-socks-toe

As usual, I had to sit alone to graft the toe together with the Kitchener Stitch, quietly chanting the instructions to myself (knit front slip, purl front stay, purl back slip, knit back stay, repeat).

One down, one to go. What are you making this weekend?

 

 

New Knitter Pride

April 4, 2018

Some WIPs (works in progress) on a Wednesday: Not all of the students in my Knit 101 class are true novices, but every month or so, a brand new knitter walks through the door. Chris and Justin are the most recent, each with their own motivations for learning a new craft.

Ten-year old Chris arrived with his mother, a non-knitter, a few weeks ago and explained he thought knitting looked cool. Yup, you read that right. While he’s got a goal of making a sweater someday, he started with a practice swatch in garter stitch and last week learned the purl stitch. His concentration and quiet pride warm my heart.

New-knitter.jpeg

When Justin walked through the door, I thought he was looking for directions to someplace else! He’s not your typical Saturday morning knit class member: a male, accountant in his late 20s.

His motivation for learning to knit? He resolved to learn 10 new things this year. How cool is that?! So far, he’s learned to bake bread and play golf (at an indoor range until the snow melts). When summer comes, he wants to learn how to water ski. His knitting goal is socks for his girlfriend but, like Chris, happily — and very conscientiously — dived into knits and purls.

Novice-knitter.jpeg

After completing her son’s hat, Louise is working on a scarf (the pattern name escapes me at the moment) in a beautiful variegated yarn. She’s been perusing sweater patterns, so it’s likely she’ll add another project soon.

Louise-scarf.jpeg

Jacqui recently returned to class after a winter hiatus and has cast on a hat. Before she joins the stitches in the round, I encouraged her to knit an inch or two flat, so that it’ll be easier to join without twisting. The subtle color shifts in this Madeline Tosh yarn are exquisite.

Jacqui-ribbing.jpeg

I’ve been spending most of my knitting time with the second sock. I’ll get back to the Sunshine Coast one of these days. What’s on your needles?

Sock2

Traditions and travels

April 2, 2018

The house is quiet again as Kevin and Michael left this morning via plane and car after being home for the past few days.

As is my tradition, I baked the lamb cake, using the metal mold bought by my Mom more than 60 years ago in Boston’s North End.

I tweaked the recipe a bit – adding the zest of one lemon to the batter, which is similar to pound cake so the cake can “stand up.”

After morning Mass, we brunched at home, and I finished the cake while the boyos cleaned up.

Since it was a beautiful spring day and we had a couple of hours before we were due at my brother’s house for dinner, we headed to our favorite quick, local hike.

Recent snow melt made the trail mucky in parts, but we didn’t care a bit. As always, tossing a football along the trail was mandatory.

The tower at the summit was open again after being closed for repairs when we were there for the family Thanksgiving Day hike. Beautiful views of Downtown Boston and the harbor.

Easter dinner at Luke and Mary’s was delicious and the conversation lively. As usual, the lamb cake platter was graced with eggs decorated with colored paper, including photocopies of photos and tissue paper. Most were made by my late in-laws and some are nearly 20 years old.

After second helpings and another sliver of cake, we headed home to close out the evening — and the boys’ visit — with a friendly yet competitive game of pinochle.

The sock and I observed.

Some Things are Never Finished

March 24, 2018

When my children were very young, I didn’t knit much. I thought I didn’t have enough time, which is bizarre because there’s the same amount of time in Every. Single. Day. If I’d been honest with myself, I would have realized that it wasn’t a matter of time; it was my perception of time and my very real reality of seemingly all-consuming busyness.

My mind was shifted by a single comment from a wise neighbor to whom I’d shared the desire to knit but didn’t have time: “When you’re raising a family, running a home, and working at your job, you might find that it’d be nice to actually finish something.”

How very true. So much of daily life is repetitive or ongoing — cook a meal, wash the dishes, wait a few hours, and do it again. Wake up, rally the troops, get everyone out the door (fed, dressed, and as put together as possible), then do it in reverse in each evening. And again. And again. For years, decades even.

One of the joys of knitting is finishing. In fact, I consider finishing the primary goal of a new knitter’s first project. That’s why I recommend a dishcloth as a first project and definitely not a scarf, which can take an eternity.

With that thought, I’m pleased to report that Sock #1 is finished.

Sock1-done-roving

Since I’d not been happy with the bumpiness of my previous sock toe grafting, I paid extra attention to my Kitchener stitching. This is an improvement over my earlier toes.

Sock-toe-kitchener

Part of my desire to finish the sock was my seemingly slow progress on the Sunshine Coast sweater. The slower pace isn’t surprising since it’s now up to about 250 stitches per round.

Sunshine

On the home front, dear Michael is home for a week’s break. Since he arrived at midnight and will likely sleep a solid 12 hours, I won’t see him until this afternoon, after Knit 101 class and the Boston March for Our Lives.

Being a parent or a child is a role (not really an “activity”) that doesn’t feel like it’s ever finished — at least, if you’re as lucky as I am, not for many, many decades.

WIP Wednesday: Socks and Sunshine

March 21, 2018

Having lived most of my life in New England, I’m accustomed to cold, snowy winters. I generally try to avoid the broadcast and social media hoopla that surrounds storm predictions and round-the-clock coverage during the actual “weather events.”

My attitude generally is “It’s winter. What do you expect?” Does it really matter whether the wind gusts that knocked out the power were 40 or 75 miles per hour? The difference between six and 12 or even 22 inches is significant from a shoveling perspective, but really it’s just a hell of a lot of shoveling.

Like probably everyone else in New England (and probably most people from here to Washington, DC), I’m ready for today’s storm to winter’s last gasp — especially since Spring began yesterday!

Enough about the weather. Here’s what’s on my needles these days. The toe of Sock #1 is nearly finished (Done Roving “Frolicking Feet”). I’m going to modify — or at least pay closer attention to — my Kitchener stitch grafting of the toe in an attempt to avoid the bumpiness of my previous sock toes.

Sock-toe-shaping

I can’t decide how I feel about the Sunshine Coast sweater yet. We’re still getting to know each other. (Perhaps it’s mutual.) Progress is slow and feels a bit painstaking. I find myself looking at the pattern several times during each pattern round. Hoping that changes over the next couple of inches.

Sunshine-coast-yoke

I love the bright Spring green yarn.

Socks on the Beach

March 9, 2018

“That’s so unlike you!” was the response from each of our children when we told them of our four-day trip to Florida. But January’s deep freeze had us planning for a warm weather get-away, and as luck would have it, we were away for a ferocious Nor’easter.

As usual, Patrick was first into the ocean. I’m more inclined to walk, look for shells, watch the wildlife (human and other), sit and knit — all the while mesmerized by the sound, sight, and smell of the sea.

PLD-Florida-beach

On the flight, I’d seamed the toe of Sock #2, wove in the ends, and then cast on a new sock. As usual, it’s a basic, top-down sock pattern; this one in Done Roving’s “Frolicking Feet” (Peacock colorway).

Sock-beach

The hotel loaned bikes (and kayaks) to guests — on the honor system, no less — so we explored some of the surrounding area. Shell seekers comb the beaches for hours, searching for treasures, some for souvenirs but many for their small businesses.

We had the pleasure of meeting an Ambassador from the nearby National Shell Museum (who knew?!). He identified some of our shells and advised us to clean the shells in a 1:4 bleach/water bath so they wouldn’t stink. His “I Know Shells. Ask Me” t-shirt was well earned!

Shell-seekers

After a morning yoga class, I discovered an historic cemetery, nestled under the trees only 50 yards from the sea. Grave markers, including this one of a 10 year-old girl who died in the 1880s, were often “decorated” with shells and sea glass.

Captiva-cemetery2

One afternoon, we opted for a guided kayak tour of the bay and a mangrove forest. In the quiet of the forest, we saw and heard birds — white ibises, osprey, turkey vultures, and pelicans —  dozens of ancient shell mounds from the Calusa natives, spider-like black shrimp that climbed the mangroves (fortunately staying far away from us humans).

PLD-kayak

The sock joined us for its — and our — first Spring Training baseball game.

Sock-redsox (1)

The get-away may have been unlike us, but given how wonderful and relaxing it was, that just might change.

MAH-PLD-Captiva

The “Unquestionable Benefit” of Handknit Socks

March 3, 2018

Kevin’s been a fan of my knit socks since his first pair nearly five years ago. He’s even agreed to be a model for blog photos. Every once in while, he’ll text me a photo — usually from a table in the university library — of his feet, wrapped in lucky socks, as he studies for exams.

As he slogged his way through mid-term exams this week, he sent the following to our family group text:

Pro tip: Mom’s knitted socks are real juju for taking midterms. Even if they might not have all the answers, their benefit is unquestionable

KRD-lucky-socks

Warms the cockles of this mother’s heart.

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