Posts Tagged ‘socks’

Duo of Finished Objects

August 5, 2018

I try not to set too many knitting goals for myself, but sometimes a knitter has to do what she has to do. And I must admit that I’m quite pleased to have achieved my vacation knitting goal of completing two projects.

Since they had a true deadline — birthdays are exact dates after all — the Monkey Socks were my top priority. A couple of people have asked about the significance of the name. The simple truth is that it’s the name of the pattern by Cookie, available on Ravelry and on Knitty.

On the 26th and final repeat of the 11 row pattern, I finally committed it to memory. A relatively quick toe shaping and seaming and then into a pot of sudsy water.

They dried quickly in the sunshine and were tucked away for the birthday girl.

Yarn is Flying Finn Yarns one-of-a-kind (OOAK) that I bought at J.P. Knit & Stitch’s reopening a few months ago. I just love the subtle color variations.

At that point there was no way to avoid the Sunshine Coast sweater anymore. As I explained earlier, I had a bit of an emotional hurdle to overcome on that one. But finish I did, and I’m delighted to report that I’m delighted with the final product.

On the ferry back to the mainland, I started my next project, a Baby Vertebrae frontless cardigan for a friend’s baby-to-be, who’s expected to make an appearance in early September.

baby-vertebrae-ferry

Since I’ve now got only one WIP, I feel free to cast on something else. I’ve got time, right? Unlike birthdays, baby due dates aren’t exact — until they become birthdays, of course!

 

 

 

Advertisements

Socks on a train

July 2, 2018

Has anyone seen June? It was just here, but now it’s gone!

Patrick and I had a marvelous weekend in New York City, the highlight of which was seeing Hannah perform in her first cabaret. More on that in a future post.

For today, here’s the start of Monkey Sock #2, heading east along southern Connecticut.

It’s knitting up faster now that I’ve got the hang of the pattern. I still need to read each line of the 12-round repeats, but all I need is a glance.

My knitting goal this week is to finish the Sunshine Coast sweater – just one sleeve to go. What’s up with you this week?

Monkeying Around

June 29, 2018

Based on comments from my last post, there’s a lot of folks who’d like to see more of the Monkey Socks (or, given the state of my progress, the Monkey Sock). Socks are my go-to knitting project, especially when I’m traveling since they’re easy to stuff tuck into a bag.

So a couple of weeks ago, as dear Jenn and I headed to Martha’s Vineyard for a quick visit to our sister-friend Kate, new owner of an awesome toy store on the island, I cast on a sock.

image

While I’ve curbed my yarn-buying activity a fair bit recently, I make an exception for sock yarn. Unlike that scrumptious skein of DK weight merino or chunky baby alpaca, I know exactly what I’ll make with 400 yards of sock yarn.

I love the almost neutral, subtle color changes in this luscious skein from Flying Finn Yarns. It called out for something other than my usual Good Plain Sock Recipe, so I searched for a pattern with some texture and detail.

Monkey Socks (free from Knitty) caught my eye, with curves and weaves and a little bit of lace. Fear not, just a few yarn overs here and there. I like the addition of the twisted rib at the cuff — just to shake things up a bit from a traditional K1 P1 ribbing.

monkey-socks-salon

I made the heel flap in Eye of Partridge instead of the plain stockinette called for in the pattern.

monkey-socks-heel

The pattern continues all along the top of the foot until the toe. Good thing my feet were clean in this shot!

monkey-socks-toe

As usual, I had to sit alone to graft the toe together with the Kitchener Stitch, quietly chanting the instructions to myself (knit front slip, purl front stay, purl back slip, knit back stay, repeat).

One down, one to go. What are you making this weekend?

 

 

New Knitter Pride

April 4, 2018

Some WIPs (works in progress) on a Wednesday: Not all of the students in my Knit 101 class are true novices, but every month or so, a brand new knitter walks through the door. Chris and Justin are the most recent, each with their own motivations for learning a new craft.

Ten-year old Chris arrived with his mother, a non-knitter, a few weeks ago and explained he thought knitting looked cool. Yup, you read that right. While he’s got a goal of making a sweater someday, he started with a practice swatch in garter stitch and last week learned the purl stitch. His concentration and quiet pride warm my heart.

New-knitter.jpeg

When Justin walked through the door, I thought he was looking for directions to someplace else! He’s not your typical Saturday morning knit class member: a male, accountant in his late 20s.

His motivation for learning to knit? He resolved to learn 10 new things this year. How cool is that?! So far, he’s learned to bake bread and play golf (at an indoor range until the snow melts). When summer comes, he wants to learn how to water ski. His knitting goal is socks for his girlfriend but, like Chris, happily — and very conscientiously — dived into knits and purls.

Novice-knitter.jpeg

After completing her son’s hat, Louise is working on a scarf (the pattern name escapes me at the moment) in a beautiful variegated yarn. She’s been perusing sweater patterns, so it’s likely she’ll add another project soon.

Louise-scarf.jpeg

Jacqui recently returned to class after a winter hiatus and has cast on a hat. Before she joins the stitches in the round, I encouraged her to knit an inch or two flat, so that it’ll be easier to join without twisting. The subtle color shifts in this Madeline Tosh yarn are exquisite.

Jacqui-ribbing.jpeg

I’ve been spending most of my knitting time with the second sock. I’ll get back to the Sunshine Coast one of these days. What’s on your needles?

Sock2

Traditions and travels

April 2, 2018

The house is quiet again as Kevin and Michael left this morning via plane and car after being home for the past few days.

As is my tradition, I baked the lamb cake, using the metal mold bought by my Mom more than 60 years ago in Boston’s North End.

I tweaked the recipe a bit – adding the zest of one lemon to the batter, which is similar to pound cake so the cake can “stand up.”

After morning Mass, we brunched at home, and I finished the cake while the boyos cleaned up.

Since it was a beautiful spring day and we had a couple of hours before we were due at my brother’s house for dinner, we headed to our favorite quick, local hike.

Recent snow melt made the trail mucky in parts, but we didn’t care a bit. As always, tossing a football along the trail was mandatory.

The tower at the summit was open again after being closed for repairs when we were there for the family Thanksgiving Day hike. Beautiful views of Downtown Boston and the harbor.

Easter dinner at Luke and Mary’s was delicious and the conversation lively. As usual, the lamb cake platter was graced with eggs decorated with colored paper, including photocopies of photos and tissue paper. Most were made by my late in-laws and some are nearly 20 years old.

After second helpings and another sliver of cake, we headed home to close out the evening — and the boys’ visit — with a friendly yet competitive game of pinochle.

The sock and I observed.

Some Things are Never Finished

March 24, 2018

When my children were very young, I didn’t knit much. I thought I didn’t have enough time, which is bizarre because there’s the same amount of time in Every. Single. Day. If I’d been honest with myself, I would have realized that it wasn’t a matter of time; it was my perception of time and my very real reality of seemingly all-consuming busyness.

My mind was shifted by a single comment from a wise neighbor to whom I’d shared the desire to knit but didn’t have time: “When you’re raising a family, running a home, and working at your job, you might find that it’d be nice to actually finish something.”

How very true. So much of daily life is repetitive or ongoing — cook a meal, wash the dishes, wait a few hours, and do it again. Wake up, rally the troops, get everyone out the door (fed, dressed, and as put together as possible), then do it in reverse in each evening. And again. And again. For years, decades even.

One of the joys of knitting is finishing. In fact, I consider finishing the primary goal of a new knitter’s first project. That’s why I recommend a dishcloth as a first project and definitely not a scarf, which can take an eternity.

With that thought, I’m pleased to report that Sock #1 is finished.

Sock1-done-roving

Since I’d not been happy with the bumpiness of my previous sock toe grafting, I paid extra attention to my Kitchener stitching. This is an improvement over my earlier toes.

Sock-toe-kitchener

Part of my desire to finish the sock was my seemingly slow progress on the Sunshine Coast sweater. The slower pace isn’t surprising since it’s now up to about 250 stitches per round.

Sunshine

On the home front, dear Michael is home for a week’s break. Since he arrived at midnight and will likely sleep a solid 12 hours, I won’t see him until this afternoon, after Knit 101 class and the Boston March for Our Lives.

Being a parent or a child is a role (not really an “activity”) that doesn’t feel like it’s ever finished — at least, if you’re as lucky as I am, not for many, many decades.

WIP Wednesday: Socks and Sunshine

March 21, 2018

Having lived most of my life in New England, I’m accustomed to cold, snowy winters. I generally try to avoid the broadcast and social media hoopla that surrounds storm predictions and round-the-clock coverage during the actual “weather events.”

My attitude generally is “It’s winter. What do you expect?” Does it really matter whether the wind gusts that knocked out the power were 40 or 75 miles per hour? The difference between six and 12 or even 22 inches is significant from a shoveling perspective, but really it’s just a hell of a lot of shoveling.

Like probably everyone else in New England (and probably most people from here to Washington, DC), I’m ready for today’s storm to winter’s last gasp — especially since Spring began yesterday!

Enough about the weather. Here’s what’s on my needles these days. The toe of Sock #1 is nearly finished (Done Roving “Frolicking Feet”). I’m going to modify — or at least pay closer attention to — my Kitchener stitch grafting of the toe in an attempt to avoid the bumpiness of my previous sock toes.

Sock-toe-shaping

I can’t decide how I feel about the Sunshine Coast sweater yet. We’re still getting to know each other. (Perhaps it’s mutual.) Progress is slow and feels a bit painstaking. I find myself looking at the pattern several times during each pattern round. Hoping that changes over the next couple of inches.

Sunshine-coast-yoke

I love the bright Spring green yarn.

Socks on the Beach

March 9, 2018

“That’s so unlike you!” was the response from each of our children when we told them of our four-day trip to Florida. But January’s deep freeze had us planning for a warm weather get-away, and as luck would have it, we were away for a ferocious Nor’easter.

As usual, Patrick was first into the ocean. I’m more inclined to walk, look for shells, watch the wildlife (human and other), sit and knit — all the while mesmerized by the sound, sight, and smell of the sea.

PLD-Florida-beach

On the flight, I’d seamed the toe of Sock #2, wove in the ends, and then cast on a new sock. As usual, it’s a basic, top-down sock pattern; this one in Done Roving’s “Frolicking Feet” (Peacock colorway).

Sock-beach

The hotel loaned bikes (and kayaks) to guests — on the honor system, no less — so we explored some of the surrounding area. Shell seekers comb the beaches for hours, searching for treasures, some for souvenirs but many for their small businesses.

We had the pleasure of meeting an Ambassador from the nearby National Shell Museum (who knew?!). He identified some of our shells and advised us to clean the shells in a 1:4 bleach/water bath so they wouldn’t stink. His “I Know Shells. Ask Me” t-shirt was well earned!

Shell-seekers

After a morning yoga class, I discovered an historic cemetery, nestled under the trees only 50 yards from the sea. Grave markers, including this one of a 10 year-old girl who died in the 1880s, were often “decorated” with shells and sea glass.

Captiva-cemetery2

One afternoon, we opted for a guided kayak tour of the bay and a mangrove forest. In the quiet of the forest, we saw and heard birds — white ibises, osprey, turkey vultures, and pelicans —  dozens of ancient shell mounds from the Calusa natives, spider-like black shrimp that climbed the mangroves (fortunately staying far away from us humans).

PLD-kayak

The sock joined us for its — and our — first Spring Training baseball game.

Sock-redsox (1)

The get-away may have been unlike us, but given how wonderful and relaxing it was, that just might change.

MAH-PLD-Captiva

The “Unquestionable Benefit” of Handknit Socks

March 3, 2018

Kevin’s been a fan of my knit socks since his first pair nearly five years ago. He’s even agreed to be a model for blog photos. Every once in while, he’ll text me a photo — usually from a table in the university library — of his feet, wrapped in lucky socks, as he studies for exams.

As he slogged his way through mid-term exams this week, he sent the following to our family group text:

Pro tip: Mom’s knitted socks are real juju for taking midterms. Even if they might not have all the answers, their benefit is unquestionable

KRD-lucky-socks

Warms the cockles of this mother’s heart.

Not Your Usual Bread Baking

February 18, 2018

For the past few years, I’ve been one of the bakers of my church’s eucharistic bread, the round, unleavened bread that’s blessed as part of the Mass and shared with the community. About every five or six weeks, it’s my turn to bring 5 “loaves” to the Saturday afternoon Mass. I’m always afraid that, in the midst of the comings and goings of the weekend, I’ll forget to bake, so I add a reminder to the fridge door.

I really love to bake yeast bread but rarely do so. I love proofing the yeast, kneading the dough, watching it rise, shaping the loaves. And the smell? Heavenly!

Unleavened bread? Not so much. It’s not meant to be kneaded more than a couple minutes before being patted into a circle and rolled thin.

Bread

The balance of sticky and floury is a delicate one. On more than one occasion, I’ve had to start over after scraping a stuck loaf off the counter. After rolling, each loaf is imprinted with a special press (the name of which escapes me). This is another opportunity for stickiness!

Bread2

Yesterday, I had some extra dough which is patted into lumpy free-form circles. Perfect with my supper of turkey soup!

Bread4

In knitting news, progress on Sock #2 is brought to you in part by the Winter Olympics and the NBA Slam Dunk and Three-Pointer competitions.

123sock

For the New Life to Come

February 16, 2018

In the midst of breath-stopping tragedy and rage from my country’s latest mass murder, finishing a knitting project for a baby-to-be has been a welcome respite. When the project made its last appearance on the blog, I was in search of buttons and had cast on for a little pair of shorts (or, as the pattern called it, a diaper cover).

My search for green buttons yielded lots of unsuitable options – pastels, leaf, pine — but not the bright apple green that I wanted. So I switched to pink and found the perfect pair.

Wee-penny-buttons

Before sewing them on the top, I finished the bottom (if you’ll pardon the expression!). The pattern called for longer ribbing on the “legs” that would then be folded over like a cuff. Since this will be for an infant who won’t be moving much at all, I decided about six rows of ribbing would be plenty.

Wee-penny-bottom

The seed stitch pattern makes the flowers look a little wonky but so what? Although there’s not really a front or back on the cover, I think of this side as the back. The flower pattern lands on the waist (something a baby doesn’t even have!) on the other side, which seems more front-ish.

There’s probably enough yarn left for a little hat or two. For another baby at another time, I think.

Once I was done weaving in the ends on the diaper cover, I untwisted the yarn and sewed on the buttons.

Wee-penny-top

I’m quite pleased with the results and expect the mother-to-be will be, too.

Wee-penny-set

Lest I get tempted by another project, I immediately cast on the next striped sock because, you know, Second Sock Syndrome is real.

Sock-cast-on.jpeg

Diagnosis: Second Sock Syndrome

January 26, 2018

The sock is done and looks quite nice. It’s a bit big for my foot, but it’s not meant for me. I don’t know the eventual recipient yet, but I know it’s not me. That’s not a problem.

Knit sock on foot

Here’s the problem: I’ve come down with Second Sock Syndrome. Instead of casting on this sock’s mate, I’ve fallen for a clever yarn and the prospect of a baby knit.

Skein Baby Blossom DK yarn

The trigger was the arrival of an invitation to a baby shower for a marvelous young woman, who’s also a first cousin once removed. As soon as I learned of her pregnancy, I began thinking of what to knit the lucky baby-to-be.

What? That’s not the usual reaction to pregnancy news?!

Before heading to Mom’s house today, I zipped to a nearby yarn store and grabbed a skein of Hayfield Baby Blossom DK. It’s patterned but not exactly self-striping and knits up with banners (kind of like stripes) interspersed with little flowers.

I’m just getting started so you’ll have to trust me on this one.

First inch of knitting

As for the Second Sock — you’ll have to trust me that it’ll get finished someday. I promise to share.

It’s Been a Minute

January 24, 2018

OK, it’s been waaaaay more than a minute, but here we are.

I’ve been traveling a lot for work and made good progress on Hannah’s throw (Siman Baby Blanket in Cascade 128 Superwash). But after a few square feet, I had to face the reality that it was getting too big to schlep about on the Metro and airplanes.

Simran-throw-growing

Clearly, socks  – the perfect travel companion – were needed. I dug out some lovely self-striping Felici from Knit Picks – colorway is Toucan.

Felici-sock-yarn

It felt great to be knitting a sock again! Part of what I love about making socks is the design and simple engineering of the thing. Although I’ve tried a couple at least one toe-up version, I prefer top-down.

Knit-sock-ribbing

My go-to pattern is the Yarn Harlot’s Good Plain Sock Recipe. I’ve made more than a dozen pairs with it, and it never fails to please me — nor the recipient. Kevin got a pair for Christmas. Same yarn, different colorway.

Kevin-socks

An added benefit of sock knitting? Totally portable, just about anywhere — for example, on a plane.

Knit-sock-airplane

It’s nice to be back. What’s on your needles these days?

 

 

Midwest Travels with Son and Sock

February 26, 2017

Michael and I spent a busy few days in the Midwest last week, visiting a college for Admitted Students Day, driving about 600 miles, and exploring the Windy City during a freakishly warm spell. The sock joined us for the journey and, like our waist lines, got bigger.

We arrived in Chicago by way of New York (more on that weekend visit in a future post) and drove southeast through wind turbine-covered farmland in Indiana to the college town of Miami, OH. Dinner at a local sports bar made for a great evening of pro hockey, the NBA All-Star Blow-out Game, and people-watching. Michael wondered if the lively table near us were faculty. He was puzzled when I somewhat cynically told him that they were too young and too funny to be college professors. “Old?!” Ah to be 18 again…

oxfordoh-sportsbar

My plan to explore the campus during my morning run was stymied by the thick fog that had developed overnight. Beautiful and somewhat mysterious…

miami-ohio-fog2

The sock made its first appearance during one of the presentations, hanging out in the back row.

sock-heel-2017

I’m not coordinated enough to knit while walking on a campus tour, and deciding to be as non-embarrassing a parent as I could, chose to keep the sock in my bag for the rest of the day.

The next day, we retraced our steps to Chicago – the turbines not such a novelty the second time around. After checking in to our hotel, we walked to nearby Millennium Park, a civic treasure. Thanks to the warm weather, hundreds of people were out and about, enjoying the sunshine, skating at a public outdoor rink, and marveling the “Cloud Gate”sculpture, aka “The Bean.”

chicago-bean

I confess the view from underneath the structure made me feel a bit queasy when I looked up and turned to see the various angles and perspectives.

inside-chicago-bean

Watching people interact with the sculpture was an unending source of amusement. Little kids were the most fun to watch, but I didn’t want to alarm parents by photographing them.

chicago-bean2

Fog rolled in overnight, this time from Lake Michigan, hanging low over the city before burning off by our mid-morning hop-on/hop-off bus tour.

chicago-fog

We stumbled upon the Chicago Cultural Center, a totally unexpected surprise. Housed in the former public library, the building is exquisite — as late 19th century public libraries often are — with inspiring quotations, soaring ceilings and domes, stained glass, and broad marble staircases. Dozens of people were seated as a pianist warmed up for a free lunchtime concert.

In a large gallery space, we wandered through a stunning exhibition of muralist Eugene “Eda” Wade’s doors for Malcolm X College, a collection of 16 sets of your standard issue school hallway double doors that are considered a monument to the Black Arts movement in Chicago.

murals-chicago

wade-murals

Another hop-off location of our day was Navy Pier where we rode the giant ferris wheel, formally called Centennial Wheel. The views of the city and lake were breathtaking — not so surprising since we were 200 feet above ground. I was too busy looking to take photos on our three-times-around journey, but Michael graciously shared some screen shots of his Snapchat video. I like the reflections in this one.

chicago-wheel

We spent the evening at the famed Second City comedy club, laughing (occasionally snorting, I admit) until tears ran down our cheeks at the six professionals who did sketch and improv comedy for 2.5 hours. Deferring again to my parental role, I did not knit during the show.

My run along the lake the next morning was crisp and fog-free.

chicago-sunrise

By the time we landed in Boston, the sock was ready for the toe to be seamed. I decided to wait until home for that final step — the Kitchener stitch requires my full concentration!

knit-socks-plane

What’s up in your world these days?

One Down, One to Go

January 30, 2017

Now that I’ve got a sock project on my needles, I realize how much I enjoy knitting them. It took me ages to make my first pair — not to actually make them but to tackle the project. Looking back, I realize that all the features of socks that I loved in that first pair still hold true nearly six years later.

You finish the top ribbing and it’s on to the leg.

felici-sock-yarn-jan-2017

Before you have time to get bored with the rounds of stockinette (or whatever pattern you’ve chosen), it’s on to the heel flap. I’m partial to the Eye of Partridge stitch.

 

striped-sock-knit-heel

Since learning new techniques or patterns is part of what makes knitting so enjoyable, I think I may try a new heel on my next pair. Maybe an After Thought Heel? I like the idea of making a solid colored sock with a contrasting heel and toe. Plus anything created by knitting great Elizabeth Zimmerman must be worth a try.

That’s for another day and another pair. This one — and it is only one at this point — will be my go-to Good, Plain Sock Recipe from the Yarn Harlot.

krd-striped-knit-sock

Kevin, the intended recipient of this pair, has voiced texted his approval: “It looks great!! I like the colors.” It goes without saying that he’d like a pair rather than one, so I’d best cast on the next one lest I be hit with Second Sock Syndrome. Don’t laugh — it’s a thing.

New Socks for the New Year

January 4, 2017

I’ve cast on my first project of 2017 — good old reliable socks. These are in a blue and silver gray colorway, Beyond the Wall, of Felici Sock Yarn.

To be completely candid (and why not be completely candid?), I cast on the first sock in late December but discovered after a few inches that I’d selected a too-large needle. So I ripped it all out, switched to size 1 (2.25mm), and began again. This time I’m using double-pointed needles, which I’ve learned that I prefer to the Magic Loop method. I find the DPNs faster to work with — no fiddly shifting of stitches and moving of the cable.

Do you have a preference for circular knitting? DPNs? two circulars? Magic Loop?

One Toe Up, One Top Down

July 10, 2016

One of my knitting goals this year was to knit a pair of toe-up socks. I’m half-way there.

A stretchy, soft self-striping yarn in blues and greens was the perfect combination for Kevin. (Plymouth Yarn’s Diversity in Deep Sea) He’s a big fan of handknit socks and those colors, so it was pretty much a no-brainer.

In my excitement to start, I began in my usual top-down way using the YarnHarlot’s Good, Plain Sock Recipe. Only after I’d started to turn the heel did I recall my goal of learning to knit socks from the toe-up. The result was the sock on the right (Kevin’s left) — top down, partridge eye heel flap, gusset heel, and toe grafted via Kitchener stitch.

KRD_socks_heels

Fortified with a toe-up sock book from the library (love, love, love the library!), I started the second sock from the toe. The cast-on and toe shaping took a few extra minutes, but then I was on my way. No seam!

KRD_socks_toes

I wasn’t thrilled with the heel flap — mostly because there wasn’t really a flap. But I carried on. I found a variety of heels in the toe-up book and expect I’ll try a different version next time. Kevin declared them “terrific and cozy,” high praise from a young man who’s pretty particular about his clothing.

KRD_socks2

 

 

Socks for a Sweet Teen

March 11, 2016

Before I’d ever knit a pair of socks, I wondered what the appeal was and whether anyone in my family would wear them. So naive! Turns out that hand knit socks are blissfully comfortable, as my three kids and sweet husband — and thousands of other people! — can attest.

A few weeks ago, I was trying to figure out my next project, pulling out my stash, looking through patterns, and to be honest, getting a bit overwhelmed by the options. Michael, my 17 year old, was nearby as I muttered, “What am I going to make next?”

“I wouldn’t turn down a new pair of socks, Mom,” he said and glanced up from the basketball game he was watching.

That’s all I needed. The socks traveled with us on a few days of college tours and information sessions — prime knitting opportunities!

IMG_1484

After we got home, I turned the heel, knit the foot, and shaped the toe.   Yesterday morning — after my second cup of coffee and armed with the Kitchener instructions — I grafted the toe.

Michael declared them fabulous and agreed to model.   He even did a little New Sock Shuffle with his happy feet.

“I Wouldn’t Turn Down Socks, Mom”

January 17, 2016

With the completion of the green-gray Chromatic Cowl, I found myself in the unusual situation of not having a Work in Progress (WIP).

As I pulled out some patterns, knitting books, and bits of my yarn stash, I mentioned my dilemma — or opportunity — to Michael. He thought for a moment and, without really trying, came up with a solution.

“I wouldn’t turn down socks, Mom.”

The Yarn Harlot’s Good, Plain Sock Recipe in 3p, 1k ribbing. Cherry Tree Hill Yarn’s self-striping “Fingerpaints” in Java Jive colorway.

Treasures from Knitting Class

December 19, 2015

I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again, I love teaching knitting. One of the best parts is watching a knitter, novice or one with experience, work through a project — deciphering a pattern, fixing the inevitable mistakes, and finally finishing.

First up, Debbie, a beginner whose patience, good humor, and perseverance are remarkable. She has an eye for her work, which means she can spot mistakes quickly. And, as I say in every class, every knitter — even the most experienced– makes mistakes. Debbie started with a small cotton washcloth, my go-to first project. She’s now working on a scarf (more on that in a future post).

 Next, there’s my down-the-street neighbor Marcia, who’s zipping through projects like a whirling dervish. (Do they knit?!) Her first socks were finished just in time for teen daughter’s birthday. As you can see, she loves them.

 As the mother of two teenagers, Marcia’s become a late-night knitter whose found the soothing benefits of knitting while waiting up for the safe return of said teens. She recently completed a lovely and deliciously soft chromatic cowl.

 In time for Christmas giving, Pam completed a dropped stitch scarf for her teen son. He’s not usually a scarf wearer, but after holding this soft beauty, he declared that he’d definitely wear this one.

 Gillan, a fiber artist, has finished an exquisite sweater and hat for a friend’s child. Regular readers will recall Gillan’s sweater seaming challenge, which she obviously remedied.   I’m particularly fond of her choice of buttons, picking up on the fiery colors of the yarn.   I hope this gives you an idea of why I love these knitting students, whom I proudly dub “Fearless Knitters.”

%d bloggers like this: