Posts Tagged ‘vacation’

Hazy Summer Days & an Epic Rally

July 22, 2018

I’m not naive enough to believe that vacations are long, lazy days that stretch on forever, but I must admit that I thought I’d be able to write a blog post or two during our vacation week. I chalk up my failure to achieve that “goal” to my brain being in decompression mode combined with a desire to cut down my time on the laptop.

Anyway, here we are — in the hazy, humid days of late July on our favorite island. Nantucket is known, in part, as the “Little Grey Lady of the Sea” for the cool fog that rolls over this “Faraway Isle” as the afternoon temperature drops. Afternoon is often when the waves pick up along the south shore beaches, bringing out wetsuit-clad surfers who wait for something to ride.

cisco-haze

Brother Chris, Sister Karen, and two of their three children arrived Tuesday for a quick visit, a bit of a detour on their way back to the Washington DC area after a week on Cape Cod. In our 24 hours together, we packed in plenty of fun — tumbling and diving in the waves (not a camera-friendly spot), rousing games of corn hole in the back yard — where Aidan made the game more complicated by acting as a human pendulum crossing each tosser’s path.

Hills-cornhole

As Patrick and Karen grilled supper, the competitors recuperated on the big couch. An evening walk into town for ice cream cones and bookstore browsing (and buying) topped off the day.

hills-ack.jpg

The ferry departs near a shop called Hill’s of Nantucket, so of course, a photo was in order — even if one of the subjects had his eyes closed.

Hills-nantucket2

Given the 11-hour drive home that awaited their arrival on the mainland, they looked remarkably cheery as they departed, didn’t they?

Ferry

Given the length and complexity of their travels, it was truly an epic rally. Next year, we’ll need to plan a little better. Until then, back in the quiet of the barn, there’s Sock #2 to finish.

Sock-barn

 

 

 

 

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Porch knitting

June 25, 2017

As the rain passed and the sky began to clear over the White Mountains, we spent a lovely hour or so of our anniversary weekend on the hotel’s big front porch.

About a dozen or so people sat in the white Adirondack chairs, in small groups or solo, chatting, reading, “phoning,” or just sitting.

As luck would have it, a fellow knitter appeared, swapping out her newspaper for circular needles on which was a cowl-in-progress, knit in a gorgeous variegated yarn of blues and speckles of green, black, yellow, and purple.

Of course, I had to strike up a conversation. It’s what knitters do. And like most knitters, Annie was more than happy to talk about her project, where she got the yarn (vacation to the Cotswalds in England last year), the other project she’s working on (a drapey cardigan by Brooklyn Tweed, the name of which escapes me and I’d get lost looking through their wonderful patterns), and her next¬†project (Purl Soho’s Ombr√© Wrap).

Woman knitting on porch

I’m curious — when you see someone knitting, do you strike up a conversation?

Fiber on the Mountains

June 24, 2017

In celebration of our 25th anniversary, Patrick and I are spending a few days in the White Mountains of New Hampshire. Our plans for hiking every day have been dampened a bit by a combination of rain, thunder, and lightning — not a good combination if you’re above the tree line!

Before a low elevation hike yesterday, we wandered into the hotel’s barn where we discovered dozens of fiber producers: sheep, goats, alpacas, llamas, and a litter of six-week old rabbits.

alpacas

Before being spun into yarn skeins, the fiber is stored in bins, each labeled with the name of its “source.” Love the names: Frisbee, Mariposa, Chaplin, Millie, and Ginger.

fiber-bins-namedjpg

There’s a display of different fiber types, just around the corner from the alpacas and llamas.

As part of its programming, the hotel has needle felting workshops and demonstrations on turning sheared fiber into yarn (washing, carding, spinning — and everything in between). They also sell rovings, yarn in a variety of weights, felting kits, and felted insoles to keep your feet warm and cozy.

barn-fiber

Much to my delight, the hotel sells yarn from its own animals. I haven’t made my choice yet, so more about that in a future post.

 

 

 

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